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MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES FOR THE COMMON GOOD

Australian Pet Welfare Foundation

Contact

Name: Emeritus Professor Jacquie Rand

Position: Executive Director & Chief Scientist

Email: info@petwelfare.org.au?subject=From ProBono Australia:

Address

PO Box 5042

Kenmore East

Brisbane 4069

Share us on social media

Our Mission / Objective

The Australian Pet Welfare Foundation’s (APWF) mission is to improve the health and welfare of pets, and enrich the bond between pets and people. We are committed to getting to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable animals in Australia in the next 10 years.

At present, the number of dogs and cats euthanased is heart-breaking. Heart-breaking also, are the number of human lives devastated by post-traumatic stress as a result of killing treatable cats and dogs.  The APWF believes with the right intervention and strategies, most of these animals could be saved.

The APWF was founded in 2012 to do just that.

Australia has turned the corner. The largest welfare agency in Australia, the RSPCA has halved its euthanasia rate for dogs and cats in the last 4 years, and is in striking distance of zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable dogs – a euthanasia rate of 10% or less. The top third of Victorian pounds have achieved it for dogs.  However, the worst pounds kill up to 55% of dogs and 85-95% of cats. You can help change these statistics.

The Foundation works with shelters, pounds, governments and local communities to provide evidenced-based strategies that save the lives of dogs and cats. Scientific research will provide the information and tools needed to achieve zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable dogs and cats in Australia in the next 10 years.

The APWF also funds studies to find better treatments for illnesses that afflict our much-loved companions. The pets in our community need your help to live long and healthier lives.

Helping pets also means helping people. The APWF funds studies which enrich human lives through pets.

Studies involve collaborations with welfare agencies such as the RSPCA and the Cat Haven, and leading institutions such as Melbourne University, Sydney University, Queensland University, Murdoch University and Adelaide University.

Projects in Progress

Our focus over the last two years has been on reducing euthanasia of adoptable and treatable animals, because this is where we can save most lives. There are alternatives to killing these animals, and the APWF is committed to paving the way with research-based solutions to achieve zero euthanasia of all adoptable and treatable dogs and cats within 10 years.

 

With your tax-deductible donations, the APWF is able to fund research that provides solutions to shelters, pounds, governments and communities to reduce the number of dogs and cats euthanased each day. When multiple strategies are implemented, they can have a profound effect reducing unnecessary euthanasia.

Approximately 210,000 dogs and 163,000 cats enter shelters and pounds each year in Australia, and of those, 21% of dogs and 56% of cats are euthanased. Most dogs entering shelters and pounds are between 6 months and 3 years of age. Only 10-25% are puppies. Dogs either become stray or are relinquished, mostly for owner-related reasons such as scarcity of pet-friendly rental accommodation or owner ill-health, and a minority for behavioral reasons such as escaping, boisterousness and antisocial behaviour. Over half the dogs that are euthanased, are killed because of behavior problems. In contrast to dogs, half the cats entering shelters are kittens. Approximately 60% of kittens are stray, but socialized to people, and 40% are the result of unwanted litters being born to owned queens. In many council pounds, 80 to 95% of cats are killed, although the majority are adoptable, treatable and able to be released.

There is also human cost, and half the people associated with killing adoptable and treatable animals develop post-traumatic stress. This results in mental and physical health issues, substance abuse and even suicide. The staff turn-over rate in shelters parallels the euthanasia rate.

The projects funded by APWF focus on reducing intake into shelters and increasing the number of dogs and cats that are successfully adopted.

There are currently six university-based research projects funded by the Foundation:

  1. Stress-reduction methods for shelter cats

Cats in shelters often experience high levels of stress, which greatly increases their risk of illness and subsequent euthanasia from treatable diseases such as cat flu. This study aims to identify simple strategies that can be used by shelter workers to decrease stress in shelter cats, and therefore increase their health and adoptability.

This project is based at the University of Queensland, and is in collaboration with the RSPCA QLD.

  1. Objective measurement of anxiety in dogs

Behaviour problems adversely affect the bond people have with their pets, and increase the risk of relinquishment to shelters and pounds. Of dogs euthanased in shelters in Australia, 65% are euthanased for behavioural reasons. Separation anxiety is a common cause of behavioral problems in dogs, and typically leads to a range of unwanted behaviours such as continuous barking and destructiveness.

This study aims to develop a simple test that can be used in shelters to accurately identify dogs that once adopted, will likely demonstrate behaviors associated with separation anxiety. A recent study found 23% of staff received no training on how to perform behaviour assessments in shelters. Therefore, developing an objective computer-based measurement of anxiety would help to reduce the number of dogs being euthanased due to inaccurate temperament tests.

This project aims to develop a video-based test for separation anxiety with computer-based assessment of the results, to provide objective information for shelters regarding the likelihood of separation anxiety affecting a dog after adoption.  This would facilitate affected dogs getting appropriate treatment before adoption, and matching the dog to a suitable home to reduce the risk of subsequent relinquishment.

This project is based at Melbourne University.

 

  1. Developing strategies for reducing surrenders and increasing adoptions of cats from animal shelters

An estimated 160,000 cats enter Australian shelters and pounds each year, and approximately 56% of those are euthanased. The key to reducing these numbers is decreasing the number of cats being surrendered and increasing adoption rates.  More than half the cats entering shelters and pounds are kittens, and approximately 40% of those are from owned queens. Although over 90% of cats are eventually desexed, less then half are desexed before 12 months of age, and approximately 12-20% have a litter of kittens before desexing.

The reasons for these unwanted litters are because owners did not get around to organizing the surgery, they thought the cat was too young, or they thought that having a litter was good for the cat or good for their children. Unfortunately, many of those kittens are euthanased because there are simply not enough homes for them to go to.  Cats can be pregnant by 16 weeks of age, and desexing kittens from 8-16 weeks has repeatedly been shown to be safe. Compared to the traditional age of desexing (5-9 months), desexing from 8-16 weeks is also associated with better health and behavior of the cat later in life.

This project addresses the high rates of euthanasia in cats and kittens in three ways. Firstly, it seeks to understand the resistance by veterinarians and nursing staff to performing early age desexing as a measure to reduce unwanted litters. Secondly, researchers will use data from the Cat Haven shelter in Perth, WA to determine the type of cat being surrendered and adopted, the demographics of those surrendering and adopting them.

The knowledge gained from these two aims will assist in preparation of targeted education campaigns for pet owners and veterinarians to increase early desexing, and to develop strategies to improve services to increase adoption rates and better outcomes for cats.

This study is based at Murdoch University, and is in collaboration with the Cat Haven, WA.

  1.  Genetic basis of separation-related distress in Labradors.

Separation anxiety is one of the most common behavioral problems in dogs that leads to relinquishment and euthanasia because of nuisance barking, howling, attempted escapes and property damage. Labradors are a popular breed, and are at increased risk of separation anxiety. If at-risk dogs could be identified early, and provided with early behavioural management that could delay, or even prevent the onset of the disorder, it would save lives.

Canine separation-related distress likely has a genetic basis, and identifying the genes involved provides opportunities for early identification and treatment of affected dogs. In addition, this information will facilitate the development of selective breeding strategies, and the development of specific medications to alleviate the symptoms. This could break the cycle of affected dogs being relinquished to shelters, and increase the live release rate of affected dogs.

This is a project based at the University of Sydney.

  1. Heart murmurs in shelter kittens

Many apparently healthy kittens have heart murmurs, most of which are innocent, and in time disappear. However most of these kittens are euthanased in shelters because shelter veterinarians cannot easily distinguish these kittens from other kittens with pathologic heart murmurs. Currently, there are no simple methods to determine which murmurs are innocent, and which murmurs later will affect the cat’s health. Therefore, kittens with murmurs are usually euthanased. This study aims to identify guidelines for shelter veterinarians to identify kittens with murmurs who have low risk of subsequent health problems and can be adopted. This will have a big impact on saving many kittens lives in both shelters and veterinary practices.

This project is based at the University of Sydney, and is in collaboration with RSPCA NSW

 

  1.   Online relinquishment of dogs and cats: what can we learn?

Although we have some idea of the numbers of dogs and cats relinquished to shelters and pounds, there are currently no estimates for the numbers relinquished online, or where they are coming from. This study aims to determine the numbers of cats and dogs relinquished online, to produce demographic data, and to determine the reasons behind this type of pet relinquishment. This information can be used to design evidence-based interventions to more effectively reduce the numbers of pets who find themselves in unsuitable homes, and are subsequently relinquished.

This is a study based at the University of Adelaide.

The Foundation researches “the why” in pet illnesses, diseases and behaviors that lead to abandonment and euthanasia. Please help us get to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable pets in the next 10 years. Helping pets means helping people.

Our People

Names of Board Members

Our Board of Directors

We’re proud to have such a dedicated Board of Directors dedicated to our cause.

Frank Terranova,  B.Com, FCA, CFTP

Mr Frank Terranova is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants and has extensive global experience in corporate finance and risk management. He is a pet lover, and is a strong advocate of the power of evidence-based strategies to reduce the number of adoptable dogs and cats being euthanased in shelters and council pounds.

Frank has excelled at positioning companies for sustainable growth by applying strict capital management disciplines as well as introducing corporate governance improvement initiatives to ensure the transition from current state to the next phase of their corporate evolution is achieved.

Mr Terranova has held senior executive roles with companies in the mining, agricultural and manufacturing sectors. He is currently Managing Director and CEO of emerging company Southern Cross Goldfields Limited and was previously the Managing Director and CEO of Allied Gold Mining PLC which was taken over in 2012, culminating a growth from $80M to in excess of $550M over a four years.

A substantial period of time over this period included operating in developing countries within the Pacific Rim where substantial development programs involving partnering with local communities was successfully undertaken in the areas of health and employment training.

Prior to that he was Chief Financial Officer of Queensland Cotton at the time the company was successfully acquired by Olam Limited in 2007. He currently sits on other Boards of public and private emerging companies assisting management with strategy development and corporate financing initiatives.

A resident of Brisbane, Australia Mr Terranova is committed to ensuring companies he is involved with realise their potential in a timely and sustainable manner.

Margaret Scott MBA FFIA CFRE

Margaret Scott has been a leader in fundraising in various organisations including Vision Australia, Cerebral Palsy League, Baptist Community Care and BlueCare and now consults to charities.  She is a dog lover, and is passionate about using her skills to improve the health and welfare of dogs and cats.

She is a past National Chairman of FIA, and past President of the Queensland Chapter. Margaret continues to serve on the Queensland Executive Committee and is a member of the national FIA Ethics Committee and Professional Development Committee.   In 2014 she was awarded the highest award in Australian fundraising, Fundraiser of the Year.

Margaret has spoken of her experience in fundraising and marketing to in Australia and internationally. She is passionate about assisting organisations  to develop fundraising professionalism based on strong ethical principles.  She believes in sharing expertise across organisations and professions for maximum effectiveness in the community.

Margaret is completing a Master of Business Research at the Queensland University of Technology and is conducting research into the relationship between organisational structures and successful fundraising in charities within the health sector.

Gina Vereker B.Arts (Geog/English), D.URP, Cert. BM, MAIM, MAICD  

Gina Vereker has had an extensive career within the public sector focusing on leadership and management roles within local government. A town planner by profession, Gina has held executive director positions with a number of local government authorities in NSW, the most recent being Wyong Shire, the 10th largest council in Australia, where she was responsible for 150 staff, a capital works budget of $55 million and annual operational expenditure of $30 million.

During her public sector career, Gina was the first woman to be appointed to an executive director position to Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Wyong Shire Council. Her accountabilities in each of these roles included oversight of the Companion Animal Pound in each local government area during a period spanning 13 years. This first-hand experience led Gina to develop a determination to make a practical contribution to reducing the number of adoptable companion animals needlessly euthanized in council pounds.

During her time as executive director with Wyong Shire Council, Gina implemented transformational change to the local Pound resulting in a reduction in the euthanasia rate from an average 50% to 93% of all animals being saved, with such change being delivered within a 3 year period.

Gina has a strong professional and personal commitment to animal welfare and a great love for all types and breeds of animals. To date she and her husband have adopted 3 dogs via animal rescue groups and rescued 3 stray cats.

Gina is currently the director and principal of planning consultancy, Big Dog Planning. Big Dog Planning is named after Gina’s Great Dane “Othello”. Othello was rescued from the Brisbane RSPCA 4 years ago.

Gina brings to the Board her practical professional knowledge of the management and enhancement of Companion Animal facilities, her understanding of applicable legislation and her experience in the implementation of successful initiatives to reduce euthanasia statistics. She also specialises in strategic planning, policy development, governance and advocacy, particularly with state and local governments.

Dr Jacquie Rand, BVSc, DVSc, MANZCVS, Dip. ACVIM (Int. Medicine)

Dr Jacquie Rand is an animal lover and long-time pet owner. She graduated from Melbourne University’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science program in 1975, and worked in veterinary practice for 8 years. She then spent 4 years doing a combined residency and doctorate program at the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada, followed by 3 years as a senior clinician at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr Rand is a registered specialist in small animal internal medicine in Australia, and a Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. In 1990 she returned to Australia to take up a senior academic position at the University of Queensland, and was appointed Professor of Companion Animal Health in 2001, and retired in 2015.

Dr Rand has been actively researching cat and dog nutrition and diabetes for more than 20 years, authoring over 100 journal articles, 115 abstracts, and 42 book chapters in international texts. She is the editor and major author of three books published by Elsevier and Wiley-Blackwell.

Key contributions include reducing the percentage of diabetic cats requiring life-long insulin administration from 85% to less than 10% through treatment with a long-acting insulin analogue and an ultra-low carbohydrate diet. These research findings have been implemented world-wide, and are the greatest single advance in management of feline diabetes in over 25 years.

Dr Rand’s research is aimed at improving the health and welfare of companion animals, and increasing the contribution they make to our lives. Currently, she is also involved in research programs in shelter medicine aimed at preventing unwanted and problem pets.

Tom Schults

Tom Schults has extensive experience in managerial positions in the automotive Industry in the Netherlands and Australia.  In 1994, he started his own Company, Mobicon Systems, which manufactures container lifting equipment for the transport industry and importers and exporters. He was a finalist in the Northern Region (Qld and NT) Entrepreneur of the Year, and a winner of the BHP Steel Award.

 

 

Registration Information

ABN

14 156 658 721

Tax Deductible

Yes

How to help us

Wills and Bequests

Including the Australian Pet Welfare Foundation in your will is a powerful way to help save lives and leave a lasting legacy.  A bequest today will save many lives tomorrow. For more information, please contact us on:    info@petwelfare.org.au or call 0412 552 582.

General Donations

To make a donations call: 1300 794 589 or go to our website: www.petwelfare.org.au/pw/make-a-donation/

We urgently need your support to get to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable pets in the next 10 years.

Work with us

Volunteer with us

www.petwelfare.org.au/contact/ for current opportunities

Our Annual Reports

Our Mission / Objective

The Australian Pet Welfare Foundation’s (APWF) mission is to improve the health and welfare of pets, and enrich the bond between pets and people. We are committed to getting to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable animals in Australia in the next 10 years.

At present, the number of dogs and cats euthanased is heart-breaking. Heart-breaking also, are the number of human lives devastated by post-traumatic stress as a result of killing treatable cats and dogs.  The APWF believes with the right intervention and strategies, most of these animals could be saved.

The APWF was founded in 2012 to do just that.

Australia has turned the corner. The largest welfare agency in Australia, the RSPCA has halved its euthanasia rate for dogs and cats in the last 4 years, and is in striking distance of zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable dogs – a euthanasia rate of 10% or less. The top third of Victorian pounds have achieved it for dogs.  However, the worst pounds kill up to 55% of dogs and 85-95% of cats. You can help change these statistics.

The Foundation works with shelters, pounds, governments and local communities to provide evidenced-based strategies that save the lives of dogs and cats. Scientific research will provide the information and tools needed to achieve zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable dogs and cats in Australia in the next 10 years.

The APWF also funds studies to find better treatments for illnesses that afflict our much-loved companions. The pets in our community need your help to live long and healthier lives.

Helping pets also means helping people. The APWF funds studies which enrich human lives through pets.

Studies involve collaborations with welfare agencies such as the RSPCA and the Cat Haven, and leading institutions such as Melbourne University, Sydney University, Queensland University, Murdoch University and Adelaide University.

Projects in Progress

Our focus over the last two years has been on reducing euthanasia of adoptable and treatable animals, because this is where we can save most lives. There are alternatives to killing these animals, and the APWF is committed to paving the way with research-based solutions to achieve zero euthanasia of all adoptable and treatable dogs and cats within 10 years.

 

With your tax-deductible donations, the APWF is able to fund research that provides solutions to shelters, pounds, governments and communities to reduce the number of dogs and cats euthanased each day. When multiple strategies are implemented, they can have a profound effect reducing unnecessary euthanasia.

Approximately 210,000 dogs and 163,000 cats enter shelters and pounds each year in Australia, and of those, 21% of dogs and 56% of cats are euthanased. Most dogs entering shelters and pounds are between 6 months and 3 years of age. Only 10-25% are puppies. Dogs either become stray or are relinquished, mostly for owner-related reasons such as scarcity of pet-friendly rental accommodation or owner ill-health, and a minority for behavioral reasons such as escaping, boisterousness and antisocial behaviour. Over half the dogs that are euthanased, are killed because of behavior problems. In contrast to dogs, half the cats entering shelters are kittens. Approximately 60% of kittens are stray, but socialized to people, and 40% are the result of unwanted litters being born to owned queens. In many council pounds, 80 to 95% of cats are killed, although the majority are adoptable, treatable and able to be released.

There is also human cost, and half the people associated with killing adoptable and treatable animals develop post-traumatic stress. This results in mental and physical health issues, substance abuse and even suicide. The staff turn-over rate in shelters parallels the euthanasia rate.

The projects funded by APWF focus on reducing intake into shelters and increasing the number of dogs and cats that are successfully adopted.

There are currently six university-based research projects funded by the Foundation:

  1. Stress-reduction methods for shelter cats

Cats in shelters often experience high levels of stress, which greatly increases their risk of illness and subsequent euthanasia from treatable diseases such as cat flu. This study aims to identify simple strategies that can be used by shelter workers to decrease stress in shelter cats, and therefore increase their health and adoptability.

This project is based at the University of Queensland, and is in collaboration with the RSPCA QLD.

  1. Objective measurement of anxiety in dogs

Behaviour problems adversely affect the bond people have with their pets, and increase the risk of relinquishment to shelters and pounds. Of dogs euthanased in shelters in Australia, 65% are euthanased for behavioural reasons. Separation anxiety is a common cause of behavioral problems in dogs, and typically leads to a range of unwanted behaviours such as continuous barking and destructiveness.

This study aims to develop a simple test that can be used in shelters to accurately identify dogs that once adopted, will likely demonstrate behaviors associated with separation anxiety. A recent study found 23% of staff received no training on how to perform behaviour assessments in shelters. Therefore, developing an objective computer-based measurement of anxiety would help to reduce the number of dogs being euthanased due to inaccurate temperament tests.

This project aims to develop a video-based test for separation anxiety with computer-based assessment of the results, to provide objective information for shelters regarding the likelihood of separation anxiety affecting a dog after adoption.  This would facilitate affected dogs getting appropriate treatment before adoption, and matching the dog to a suitable home to reduce the risk of subsequent relinquishment.

This project is based at Melbourne University.

 

  1. Developing strategies for reducing surrenders and increasing adoptions of cats from animal shelters

An estimated 160,000 cats enter Australian shelters and pounds each year, and approximately 56% of those are euthanased. The key to reducing these numbers is decreasing the number of cats being surrendered and increasing adoption rates.  More than half the cats entering shelters and pounds are kittens, and approximately 40% of those are from owned queens. Although over 90% of cats are eventually desexed, less then half are desexed before 12 months of age, and approximately 12-20% have a litter of kittens before desexing.

The reasons for these unwanted litters are because owners did not get around to organizing the surgery, they thought the cat was too young, or they thought that having a litter was good for the cat or good for their children. Unfortunately, many of those kittens are euthanased because there are simply not enough homes for them to go to.  Cats can be pregnant by 16 weeks of age, and desexing kittens from 8-16 weeks has repeatedly been shown to be safe. Compared to the traditional age of desexing (5-9 months), desexing from 8-16 weeks is also associated with better health and behavior of the cat later in life.

This project addresses the high rates of euthanasia in cats and kittens in three ways. Firstly, it seeks to understand the resistance by veterinarians and nursing staff to performing early age desexing as a measure to reduce unwanted litters. Secondly, researchers will use data from the Cat Haven shelter in Perth, WA to determine the type of cat being surrendered and adopted, the demographics of those surrendering and adopting them.

The knowledge gained from these two aims will assist in preparation of targeted education campaigns for pet owners and veterinarians to increase early desexing, and to develop strategies to improve services to increase adoption rates and better outcomes for cats.

This study is based at Murdoch University, and is in collaboration with the Cat Haven, WA.

  1.  Genetic basis of separation-related distress in Labradors.

Separation anxiety is one of the most common behavioral problems in dogs that leads to relinquishment and euthanasia because of nuisance barking, howling, attempted escapes and property damage. Labradors are a popular breed, and are at increased risk of separation anxiety. If at-risk dogs could be identified early, and provided with early behavioural management that could delay, or even prevent the onset of the disorder, it would save lives.

Canine separation-related distress likely has a genetic basis, and identifying the genes involved provides opportunities for early identification and treatment of affected dogs. In addition, this information will facilitate the development of selective breeding strategies, and the development of specific medications to alleviate the symptoms. This could break the cycle of affected dogs being relinquished to shelters, and increase the live release rate of affected dogs.

This is a project based at the University of Sydney.

  1. Heart murmurs in shelter kittens

Many apparently healthy kittens have heart murmurs, most of which are innocent, and in time disappear. However most of these kittens are euthanased in shelters because shelter veterinarians cannot easily distinguish these kittens from other kittens with pathologic heart murmurs. Currently, there are no simple methods to determine which murmurs are innocent, and which murmurs later will affect the cat’s health. Therefore, kittens with murmurs are usually euthanased. This study aims to identify guidelines for shelter veterinarians to identify kittens with murmurs who have low risk of subsequent health problems and can be adopted. This will have a big impact on saving many kittens lives in both shelters and veterinary practices.

This project is based at the University of Sydney, and is in collaboration with RSPCA NSW

 

  1.   Online relinquishment of dogs and cats: what can we learn?

Although we have some idea of the numbers of dogs and cats relinquished to shelters and pounds, there are currently no estimates for the numbers relinquished online, or where they are coming from. This study aims to determine the numbers of cats and dogs relinquished online, to produce demographic data, and to determine the reasons behind this type of pet relinquishment. This information can be used to design evidence-based interventions to more effectively reduce the numbers of pets who find themselves in unsuitable homes, and are subsequently relinquished.

This is a study based at the University of Adelaide.

The Foundation researches “the why” in pet illnesses, diseases and behaviors that lead to abandonment and euthanasia. Please help us get to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable pets in the next 10 years. Helping pets means helping people.

Our People

Names of Board Members

Our Board of Directors

We’re proud to have such a dedicated Board of Directors dedicated to our cause.

Frank Terranova,  B.Com, FCA, CFTP

Mr Frank Terranova is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants and has extensive global experience in corporate finance and risk management. He is a pet lover, and is a strong advocate of the power of evidence-based strategies to reduce the number of adoptable dogs and cats being euthanased in shelters and council pounds.

Frank has excelled at positioning companies for sustainable growth by applying strict capital management disciplines as well as introducing corporate governance improvement initiatives to ensure the transition from current state to the next phase of their corporate evolution is achieved.

Mr Terranova has held senior executive roles with companies in the mining, agricultural and manufacturing sectors. He is currently Managing Director and CEO of emerging company Southern Cross Goldfields Limited and was previously the Managing Director and CEO of Allied Gold Mining PLC which was taken over in 2012, culminating a growth from $80M to in excess of $550M over a four years.

A substantial period of time over this period included operating in developing countries within the Pacific Rim where substantial development programs involving partnering with local communities was successfully undertaken in the areas of health and employment training.

Prior to that he was Chief Financial Officer of Queensland Cotton at the time the company was successfully acquired by Olam Limited in 2007. He currently sits on other Boards of public and private emerging companies assisting management with strategy development and corporate financing initiatives.

A resident of Brisbane, Australia Mr Terranova is committed to ensuring companies he is involved with realise their potential in a timely and sustainable manner.

Margaret Scott MBA FFIA CFRE

Margaret Scott has been a leader in fundraising in various organisations including Vision Australia, Cerebral Palsy League, Baptist Community Care and BlueCare and now consults to charities.  She is a dog lover, and is passionate about using her skills to improve the health and welfare of dogs and cats.

She is a past National Chairman of FIA, and past President of the Queensland Chapter. Margaret continues to serve on the Queensland Executive Committee and is a member of the national FIA Ethics Committee and Professional Development Committee.   In 2014 she was awarded the highest award in Australian fundraising, Fundraiser of the Year.

Margaret has spoken of her experience in fundraising and marketing to in Australia and internationally. She is passionate about assisting organisations  to develop fundraising professionalism based on strong ethical principles.  She believes in sharing expertise across organisations and professions for maximum effectiveness in the community.

Margaret is completing a Master of Business Research at the Queensland University of Technology and is conducting research into the relationship between organisational structures and successful fundraising in charities within the health sector.

Gina Vereker B.Arts (Geog/English), D.URP, Cert. BM, MAIM, MAICD  

Gina Vereker has had an extensive career within the public sector focusing on leadership and management roles within local government. A town planner by profession, Gina has held executive director positions with a number of local government authorities in NSW, the most recent being Wyong Shire, the 10th largest council in Australia, where she was responsible for 150 staff, a capital works budget of $55 million and annual operational expenditure of $30 million.

During her public sector career, Gina was the first woman to be appointed to an executive director position to Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Wyong Shire Council. Her accountabilities in each of these roles included oversight of the Companion Animal Pound in each local government area during a period spanning 13 years. This first-hand experience led Gina to develop a determination to make a practical contribution to reducing the number of adoptable companion animals needlessly euthanized in council pounds.

During her time as executive director with Wyong Shire Council, Gina implemented transformational change to the local Pound resulting in a reduction in the euthanasia rate from an average 50% to 93% of all animals being saved, with such change being delivered within a 3 year period.

Gina has a strong professional and personal commitment to animal welfare and a great love for all types and breeds of animals. To date she and her husband have adopted 3 dogs via animal rescue groups and rescued 3 stray cats.

Gina is currently the director and principal of planning consultancy, Big Dog Planning. Big Dog Planning is named after Gina’s Great Dane “Othello”. Othello was rescued from the Brisbane RSPCA 4 years ago.

Gina brings to the Board her practical professional knowledge of the management and enhancement of Companion Animal facilities, her understanding of applicable legislation and her experience in the implementation of successful initiatives to reduce euthanasia statistics. She also specialises in strategic planning, policy development, governance and advocacy, particularly with state and local governments.

Dr Jacquie Rand, BVSc, DVSc, MANZCVS, Dip. ACVIM (Int. Medicine)

Dr Jacquie Rand is an animal lover and long-time pet owner. She graduated from Melbourne University’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science program in 1975, and worked in veterinary practice for 8 years. She then spent 4 years doing a combined residency and doctorate program at the Ontario Veterinary College, Canada, followed by 3 years as a senior clinician at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr Rand is a registered specialist in small animal internal medicine in Australia, and a Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. In 1990 she returned to Australia to take up a senior academic position at the University of Queensland, and was appointed Professor of Companion Animal Health in 2001, and retired in 2015.

Dr Rand has been actively researching cat and dog nutrition and diabetes for more than 20 years, authoring over 100 journal articles, 115 abstracts, and 42 book chapters in international texts. She is the editor and major author of three books published by Elsevier and Wiley-Blackwell.

Key contributions include reducing the percentage of diabetic cats requiring life-long insulin administration from 85% to less than 10% through treatment with a long-acting insulin analogue and an ultra-low carbohydrate diet. These research findings have been implemented world-wide, and are the greatest single advance in management of feline diabetes in over 25 years.

Dr Rand’s research is aimed at improving the health and welfare of companion animals, and increasing the contribution they make to our lives. Currently, she is also involved in research programs in shelter medicine aimed at preventing unwanted and problem pets.

Tom Schults

Tom Schults has extensive experience in managerial positions in the automotive Industry in the Netherlands and Australia.  In 1994, he started his own Company, Mobicon Systems, which manufactures container lifting equipment for the transport industry and importers and exporters. He was a finalist in the Northern Region (Qld and NT) Entrepreneur of the Year, and a winner of the BHP Steel Award.

 

 

Registration Information

ABN

14 156 658 721

Tax Deductible

Yes

How to Help us

Wills and Bequests

Including the Australian Pet Welfare Foundation in your will is a powerful way to help save lives and leave a lasting legacy.  A bequest today will save many lives tomorrow. For more information, please contact us on:    info@petwelfare.org.au or call 0412 552 582.

General Donations

To make a donations call: 1300 794 589 or go to our website: www.petwelfare.org.au/pw/make-a-donation/

We urgently need your support to get to zero euthanasia of adoptable and treatable pets in the next 10 years.

Work with us

Volunteer with us

www.petwelfare.org.au/contact/ for current opportunities

Our Annual Reports

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