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MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES FOR THE COMMON GOOD

Centenary Institute

Contact

Name: Karen McBrien

Position: Donor Communications

Email: k.mcbrien@centenary.org.au

Address

Locked Bag 6

Newtown

Sydney 2042

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Our Mission / Objective

Our Vision is Global Health through excellence in medical research and its translation.

Our Mission is to discover and bring to use novel therapeutics and diagnostics.

Our Focus is cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases.

Our Approach is understanding molecules and cells and applying these to diseases.

Our Services

The Centenary Institute is a world-leading independent Medical Research Institute.

Our strength is in uncovering disease mechanisms and applying this knowledge to improve diagnostics and treatments for patients and find cures for some of the most chronic diseases affecting today’s society.

Our Beneficiaries

We are working to discover new prevention, early diagnosis and treatment options to enable each generation to live a longer, healthier life than the one before.

Projects in Progress

The Centenary Institute is a leading medical research facility. Our research focuses on a range of health issues facing the community including:

Our People

CEO

Professor Mathew Vadas, Executive Director

Leadership Team

Professor Mathew Vadas

Executive Director
Professor Vadas trained in medicine at the University of Sydney and as a physician at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital before completing a doctorate at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne. After postdoctoral work at Harvard, he returned to Australia and built up a significant research enterprise in Adelaide. He was a chief initiator and inaugural Director of the Hanson Centre for Cancer Research (now Hanson Institute). Professor Vadas has also contributed strongly to the Australian biotechnology sector, being involved in the establishment of two ASX listed biotechnology companies. He served as Chair of the Medical Research Advisory Committee of the Australian Cancer Research Foundation for five years before stepping down in 2007. He currently serves on the Board of Governors of the SMILE Foundation and Arts & Health Foundation. His research embodies a multidisciplinary approach to discover new molecules or pathways that may uncover fundamental phenomena of nature and/or lead to novel therapeutics. Using techniques of cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics and genomics, he has primarily focused on endothelial and leucocyte biology with special emphasis on cytokines or growth factors and pathways of cellular signalling.

Professor Christopher Semsarian
Assistant Director, Faculty and Head, Molecular Cardiology Group
Professor Semsarian is a molecular cardiologist with a strong research interest in genetic heart disorders, with a particular focus on sudden cardiac death in the young. After completing his medical and cardiology training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, he undertook a highly successful PhD in the field of striated muscle biology. Professor Semsarian continued his research in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, Boston, before returning to the Centenary Institute in 2002 to establish and head the Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology.

Professor Geoff McCaughan
Assistant Director, Faculty and Head, Liver Immunobiology Group
Professor McCaughan is head of the Liver Immunology group in the Centenary Institute. Upon completion of his postdoctoral training at the University of Oxford in 1986 as a CJ Martin Fellow, he returned to Sydney where he developed the basic research programme for the AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital of which he is now the Director. His current research interests include the immunopathogenesis of human chronic liver disease, liver autoimmunity, liver transplant tolerance and molecular analysis of hepatitis C virus.

Dr Nick Pearce
Chief Operating Officer
Dr Pearce obtained a PhD in 1991 and a Master of Business Administration in 1994 from the University of Sydney. His PhD studies were undertaken at the University of Sydney and Stanford University in the field of transplantation immunology. On returning to Australia in 1991, Dr Pearce joined the Centenary Institute as a Postdoctoral Research Officer.

 

Faculty

Professor Warwick Britton
Head, Mycobacterial Group
Professor Britton graduated from the University of Sydney and trained in medicine at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and in tropical medicine at the University of Liverpool. After working in a rural hospital in Nepal for three years, he developed an interest in tuberculosis and leprosy and undertook a PhD on the Immunology of Leprosy at the University of Sydney. He spent a further four years in Nepal establishing a research laboratory in a leprosy hospital near Kathmandu in order to apply the findings of modern research to improve the care of leprosy patients.Professor Britton returned to Australia in 1990 to establish the Mycobacterial Research Group in the Centenary Institute, where his research group studies the immunology of tuberculosis and leprosy, and works on the development of new vaccines against tuberculosis.

Professor Wolfgang Weninger
Head, Immune Imaging Group
Professor Weninger received his training in clinical dermatology at the Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria (1992-1999). He then spent four years at Harvard Medical School, US, where he investigated the mechanisms of immune cell migration in vivo. Between 2003-2007, Professor Weninger was a Faculty member at the Wistar Institute and the Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, US. Recently, he was appointed Chair of the Department of Dermatology, University of Sydney. Professor Weninger’s research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of immune cell migration as well as immune cell interactions with pathogens and cancer cells. At Centenary his group makes use of advanced imaging technology, primarily intravital two-photon microscopy, in a variety of infectious and tumour models.

 

Professor Jennifer Gamble
Head, Vascular Biology Group
Professor Gamble completed her Masters Degree at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne and her PhD in 1994 at the University of Adelaide. During this time she was the first to describe the capacity of endothelial cells to be regulated by inflammatory cytokines thus exposing the endothelium as a major regulator of disease.  She was a Founding Scientist of the Hanson Centre for Cancer Research (now Hanson Institute) in Adelaide and established the Vascular Biology group within the Institute. In 2007, Prof Gamble relocated to the Centenary Institute and has established the Vascular Biology group focusing her research effort on understanding the genetic regulation, including microRNA control of endothelial cell function and on the impact of senescence (or “aging”) in disease.  She is currently a Medical Foundation Fellow, Department of Medicine, University of Sydney.

Professor John Rasko
Head, Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Group
Professor Rasko is an internationally recognised researcher in the fields of gene transfer, stem and cancer cell biology. After completing his medical and haematology training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, he undertook PhD studies at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute under the supervision of Professor Don Metcalf. He subsequently spent three years at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle as a prestigious Damon Runyon Walter Winchell Foundation Fellow. In 1999 he returned to Australia to establish the Gene Therapy Laboratory at the Centenary Institute. He is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney; Senior Staff Haematologist at the Sydney Cancer Centre and Director of the Cell and Molecular Therapy Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Associate Professor Pu Xia
Head, Signal Transduction Group
Associate Professor Xia is head of Signal Transduction research group at the Centenary Institute. After completing his medical and endocrinology training in Beijing, China, he spent three years at Harvard Medical School as a postdoctoral research fellow. In 1996 he moved to Australia and became a full-time basic scientist (from an endocrinologist) with a specific interest in cell signal transduction. He initiated the first Australian-based studies on sphingolipid signalling and has since made considerable contributions to the area. His research team has shown a consistent research profile being placed at the forefront of defining the signalling mechanisms of sphingosine kinase, characterising the functional structure of the enzyme and investigating its (patho-)physiologic implications in human diseases, specifically in cancer and diabetes.

Dr Patrick J Bertolino
Head, Liver Immunology group

Dr. Bertolino graduated from the University of Lyon in France and then trained as a post-doctoral fellow at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne (1992-95) under the supervision of Prof J. Miller. He then moved back to France at the ENS-Lyon (1995-97) before settling in Sydney at the Centenary Institute in 1997. Dr. Bertolino is internationally recognised as a world-leading expert in Liver Immunology. He has made major contributions related the ability of the liver to induce tolerance in transplantation, and chronic HCV infection. His group uses transgenic mouse models, advanced imaging technology and flow cytometry to understand how T cells interact and are instructed by liver cells in both the healthy and diseased or transplanted liver.

Names of Board Members

The Honourable Michael Egan AO (Chairman)

Mr John Samaha (Deputy Chairman)

Dr Teresa Anderson

Mr Joseph Carrozzi

Mr Michael Coleman

Professor Arthur Conigrave MD PHD FRACP

Mr Alistair Davidson

Ms Elizabeth Dibbs 

Professor Brendan Murphy

Dr Chris Roberts 

Ms Josephine Sukkar

Professor Mathew Vadas AO FAHMS

Ms Deborah Willcox

Number of Employees

200

Registration Information

ABN

85 778 244 012

Tax Deductible

Yes

How to help us

Wills and Bequests

You have the power to make a profound impact on the health of future generations.

A bequest to Centenary Institute is a lasting tribute to your belief in providing all Australians with the opportunity to live healthier, longer lives through excellence in the field of medical research. There are several ways you can include The Centenary Institute in your Will.

  • A residual bequest – a percentage of your estate
  • A pecuniary bequest – a specific amount of money
  • Items of value – such as art or jewellery

A residuary bequest is a popular choice because it maintains its relative value over time. This can be for medical research; a named Fellowship or Scholarship in honour of yourself or a loved one; or to fund a specific medical research project or laboratory area of your choice.

For more information, please contact Emily Hickman on 1800 677 977 (toll free).

General Donations

Thank you for your decision to make a donation to the Centenary Institute.

Other support

We offer three safe and easy donation options:

  • Donate online via the secure donations page on our website: https/www.centenary.org.au/support-us/donate/support-centenary-with-an-invaluable-donation/
  • Sign up to make a regular monthly gift via our website: https://www.centenary.org.au/support-us/donate/become-a-life-saving-regular-donor/
  • Call us on 1800 677 977 to make a credit card donation over the phone.

Thank you! Together we can help all Australians live, longer, healthier lives.

The Centenary Institute is a tax-deductible gift recipient. All donations $2 or more are tax deductible.

Become a Life-Saving Regular Donor:

Every day our scientists are hard at work to discover improved preventions, treatments and cures for cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. With your regular monthly support, it is only a matter of time before they find the answers we all need.

As a tax-deductible gift recipient, all donations of $2 or more are tax deductible.

As a Life-saving Regular Donor, your regular monthly gift will help fund:

o       Cancer research

o       Cardiovascular disease research

o       Infectious diseases research

o       Equipment to accelerate the pace of research

o       Recruitment and retention of the best medical research scientists

If you have any questions please contact Trudy Shaw on 1800 677 977 (toll free) or email donations@centenary.org.au

Work with us

Volunteer with us

Volunteers are welcome at the Centenary Institute

Most volunteer roles involve supporting the Foundation in an administrative or event capacity in Sydney. You may like to consider raising funds in support of the Centenary Institute in your own local area.

For a full list of available volunteer roles please visit www.govolunteer.com.au or phone Leisl on 1800 677 977.

Our Annual Reports

Our Mission / Objective

Our Vision is Global Health through excellence in medical research and its translation.

Our Mission is to discover and bring to use novel therapeutics and diagnostics.

Our Focus is cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases.

Our Approach is understanding molecules and cells and applying these to diseases.

Our Services

The Centenary Institute is a world-leading independent Medical Research Institute.

Our strength is in uncovering disease mechanisms and applying this knowledge to improve diagnostics and treatments for patients and find cures for some of the most chronic diseases affecting today’s society.

Our Beneficiaries

We are working to discover new prevention, early diagnosis and treatment options to enable each generation to live a longer, healthier life than the one before.

Projects in Progress

The Centenary Institute is a leading medical research facility. Our research focuses on a range of health issues facing the community including:

Our People

CEO

Professor Mathew Vadas, Executive Director

Leadership Team

Professor Mathew Vadas

Executive Director
Professor Vadas trained in medicine at the University of Sydney and as a physician at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital before completing a doctorate at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne. After postdoctoral work at Harvard, he returned to Australia and built up a significant research enterprise in Adelaide. He was a chief initiator and inaugural Director of the Hanson Centre for Cancer Research (now Hanson Institute). Professor Vadas has also contributed strongly to the Australian biotechnology sector, being involved in the establishment of two ASX listed biotechnology companies. He served as Chair of the Medical Research Advisory Committee of the Australian Cancer Research Foundation for five years before stepping down in 2007. He currently serves on the Board of Governors of the SMILE Foundation and Arts & Health Foundation. His research embodies a multidisciplinary approach to discover new molecules or pathways that may uncover fundamental phenomena of nature and/or lead to novel therapeutics. Using techniques of cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics and genomics, he has primarily focused on endothelial and leucocyte biology with special emphasis on cytokines or growth factors and pathways of cellular signalling.

Professor Christopher Semsarian
Assistant Director, Faculty and Head, Molecular Cardiology Group
Professor Semsarian is a molecular cardiologist with a strong research interest in genetic heart disorders, with a particular focus on sudden cardiac death in the young. After completing his medical and cardiology training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, he undertook a highly successful PhD in the field of striated muscle biology. Professor Semsarian continued his research in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, Boston, before returning to the Centenary Institute in 2002 to establish and head the Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology.

Professor Geoff McCaughan
Assistant Director, Faculty and Head, Liver Immunobiology Group
Professor McCaughan is head of the Liver Immunology group in the Centenary Institute. Upon completion of his postdoctoral training at the University of Oxford in 1986 as a CJ Martin Fellow, he returned to Sydney where he developed the basic research programme for the AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital of which he is now the Director. His current research interests include the immunopathogenesis of human chronic liver disease, liver autoimmunity, liver transplant tolerance and molecular analysis of hepatitis C virus.

Dr Nick Pearce
Chief Operating Officer
Dr Pearce obtained a PhD in 1991 and a Master of Business Administration in 1994 from the University of Sydney. His PhD studies were undertaken at the University of Sydney and Stanford University in the field of transplantation immunology. On returning to Australia in 1991, Dr Pearce joined the Centenary Institute as a Postdoctoral Research Officer.

 

Faculty

Professor Warwick Britton
Head, Mycobacterial Group
Professor Britton graduated from the University of Sydney and trained in medicine at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and in tropical medicine at the University of Liverpool. After working in a rural hospital in Nepal for three years, he developed an interest in tuberculosis and leprosy and undertook a PhD on the Immunology of Leprosy at the University of Sydney. He spent a further four years in Nepal establishing a research laboratory in a leprosy hospital near Kathmandu in order to apply the findings of modern research to improve the care of leprosy patients.Professor Britton returned to Australia in 1990 to establish the Mycobacterial Research Group in the Centenary Institute, where his research group studies the immunology of tuberculosis and leprosy, and works on the development of new vaccines against tuberculosis.

Professor Wolfgang Weninger
Head, Immune Imaging Group
Professor Weninger received his training in clinical dermatology at the Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria (1992-1999). He then spent four years at Harvard Medical School, US, where he investigated the mechanisms of immune cell migration in vivo. Between 2003-2007, Professor Weninger was a Faculty member at the Wistar Institute and the Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, US. Recently, he was appointed Chair of the Department of Dermatology, University of Sydney. Professor Weninger’s research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of immune cell migration as well as immune cell interactions with pathogens and cancer cells. At Centenary his group makes use of advanced imaging technology, primarily intravital two-photon microscopy, in a variety of infectious and tumour models.

 

Professor Jennifer Gamble
Head, Vascular Biology Group
Professor Gamble completed her Masters Degree at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne and her PhD in 1994 at the University of Adelaide. During this time she was the first to describe the capacity of endothelial cells to be regulated by inflammatory cytokines thus exposing the endothelium as a major regulator of disease.  She was a Founding Scientist of the Hanson Centre for Cancer Research (now Hanson Institute) in Adelaide and established the Vascular Biology group within the Institute. In 2007, Prof Gamble relocated to the Centenary Institute and has established the Vascular Biology group focusing her research effort on understanding the genetic regulation, including microRNA control of endothelial cell function and on the impact of senescence (or “aging”) in disease.  She is currently a Medical Foundation Fellow, Department of Medicine, University of Sydney.

Professor John Rasko
Head, Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Group
Professor Rasko is an internationally recognised researcher in the fields of gene transfer, stem and cancer cell biology. After completing his medical and haematology training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, he undertook PhD studies at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute under the supervision of Professor Don Metcalf. He subsequently spent three years at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle as a prestigious Damon Runyon Walter Winchell Foundation Fellow. In 1999 he returned to Australia to establish the Gene Therapy Laboratory at the Centenary Institute. He is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney; Senior Staff Haematologist at the Sydney Cancer Centre and Director of the Cell and Molecular Therapy Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Associate Professor Pu Xia
Head, Signal Transduction Group
Associate Professor Xia is head of Signal Transduction research group at the Centenary Institute. After completing his medical and endocrinology training in Beijing, China, he spent three years at Harvard Medical School as a postdoctoral research fellow. In 1996 he moved to Australia and became a full-time basic scientist (from an endocrinologist) with a specific interest in cell signal transduction. He initiated the first Australian-based studies on sphingolipid signalling and has since made considerable contributions to the area. His research team has shown a consistent research profile being placed at the forefront of defining the signalling mechanisms of sphingosine kinase, characterising the functional structure of the enzyme and investigating its (patho-)physiologic implications in human diseases, specifically in cancer and diabetes.

Dr Patrick J Bertolino
Head, Liver Immunology group

Dr. Bertolino graduated from the University of Lyon in France and then trained as a post-doctoral fellow at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne (1992-95) under the supervision of Prof J. Miller. He then moved back to France at the ENS-Lyon (1995-97) before settling in Sydney at the Centenary Institute in 1997. Dr. Bertolino is internationally recognised as a world-leading expert in Liver Immunology. He has made major contributions related the ability of the liver to induce tolerance in transplantation, and chronic HCV infection. His group uses transgenic mouse models, advanced imaging technology and flow cytometry to understand how T cells interact and are instructed by liver cells in both the healthy and diseased or transplanted liver.

Names of Board Members

The Honourable Michael Egan AO (Chairman)

Mr John Samaha (Deputy Chairman)

Dr Teresa Anderson

Mr Joseph Carrozzi

Mr Michael Coleman

Professor Arthur Conigrave MD PHD FRACP

Mr Alistair Davidson

Ms Elizabeth Dibbs 

Professor Brendan Murphy

Dr Chris Roberts 

Ms Josephine Sukkar

Professor Mathew Vadas AO FAHMS

Ms Deborah Willcox

Number of Employees

200

Registration Information

ABN

85 778 244 012

Tax Deductible

Yes

How to Help us

Wills and Bequests

You have the power to make a profound impact on the health of future generations.

A bequest to Centenary Institute is a lasting tribute to your belief in providing all Australians with the opportunity to live healthier, longer lives through excellence in the field of medical research. There are several ways you can include The Centenary Institute in your Will.

  • A residual bequest – a percentage of your estate
  • A pecuniary bequest – a specific amount of money
  • Items of value – such as art or jewellery

A residuary bequest is a popular choice because it maintains its relative value over time. This can be for medical research; a named Fellowship or Scholarship in honour of yourself or a loved one; or to fund a specific medical research project or laboratory area of your choice.

For more information, please contact Emily Hickman on 1800 677 977 (toll free).

General Donations

Thank you for your decision to make a donation to the Centenary Institute.

Other support

We offer three safe and easy donation options:

  • Donate online via the secure donations page on our website: https/www.centenary.org.au/support-us/donate/support-centenary-with-an-invaluable-donation/
  • Sign up to make a regular monthly gift via our website: https://www.centenary.org.au/support-us/donate/become-a-life-saving-regular-donor/
  • Call us on 1800 677 977 to make a credit card donation over the phone.

Thank you! Together we can help all Australians live, longer, healthier lives.

The Centenary Institute is a tax-deductible gift recipient. All donations $2 or more are tax deductible.

Become a Life-Saving Regular Donor:

Every day our scientists are hard at work to discover improved preventions, treatments and cures for cancer, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. With your regular monthly support, it is only a matter of time before they find the answers we all need.

As a tax-deductible gift recipient, all donations of $2 or more are tax deductible.

As a Life-saving Regular Donor, your regular monthly gift will help fund:

o       Cancer research

o       Cardiovascular disease research

o       Infectious diseases research

o       Equipment to accelerate the pace of research

o       Recruitment and retention of the best medical research scientists

If you have any questions please contact Trudy Shaw on 1800 677 977 (toll free) or email donations@centenary.org.au

Work with us

Volunteer with us

Volunteers are welcome at the Centenary Institute

Most volunteer roles involve supporting the Foundation in an administrative or event capacity in Sydney. You may like to consider raising funds in support of the Centenary Institute in your own local area.

For a full list of available volunteer roles please visit www.govolunteer.com.au or phone Leisl on 1800 677 977.

Our Annual Reports

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