Salary Survey 2018
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
NEWS  | 

Hiroshima Day: Thousands of Survivors Still Receive Treatment


Thursday, 6th August 2015 at 11:12 am
Lina Caneva, Editor
Seventy years on from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, thousands of people are still receiving treatment for cancer and other serious health problems, new figures reveal.

Thursday, 6th August 2015
at 11:12 am
Lina Caneva, Editor


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Hiroshima Day: Thousands of Survivors Still Receive Treatment
Thursday, 6th August 2015 at 11:12 am

Seventy years on from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, thousands of people are still receiving treatment for cancer and other serious health problems, new figures reveal.

Last year alone, Red Cross hospitals in Japan say they treated almost 11,000 atomic bomb survivors.

To mark Hiroshima Day, the global aid organisation, including the Australian arm, is calling for a complete elimination of nuclear weapons under international law.

"What better reason can there be for Governments around the world to act to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons once and for all?” CEO of the Australian Red Cross, Robert Tickner, said.

“This is a global humanitarian imperative and the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement is committed to seeing an end to nuclear weapons.

“We must remember the horrors of Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the price innocent civilians paid in unspeakable suffering that cannot be limited by time. There is no safe way to mount a humanitarian response to a nuclear strike.”

More than 110 countries are already signatories to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in light of the devastation caused to victims, and at the Non-Proliferation Treaty in May 156 nations called for their total elimination. Australia has pledged to neither.

“It is time to get on the right side of history. There are more than 16,000 nuclear weapons around the globe. The world’s already banned landmines, biological and chemical weapons,” Tickner said.

“It’s time to rid the globe of the most destructive weapons of all and make sure there’s never another humanitarian tragedy like Hiroshima.”

Japanese Red Cross has run hospitals for atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima since 1956 and in Nagasaki since 1969.

The hospitals have together handled more than 2.5 million outpatient visits by atomic bomb survivors and more than 2.6 million admissions of survivors as inpatients.

The data collected from Red Cross hospitals show that 63 per cent of all atomic bomb survivor deaths were caused by cancer, with the most deadly being lung cancer.


Lina Caneva  |  Editor  |  @ProBonoNews

Lina Caneva has been a journalist for more than 35 years, and Editor of Pro Bono Australia News since it was founded in 2000.


Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Tags : Hiroshima, Red Cross,

 Print

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Australian Anti-Nuclear Weapons NGO Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Luke Michael

Monday, 9th October 2017 at 5:21 pm

Urgent Call for Reform of Justice System

Lina Caneva

Thursday, 31st March 2016 at 8:56 pm

NFP Sector Must do More to Embrace Diversity

Savannah Holliday

Thursday, 3rd March 2016 at 9:53 am

POPULAR

Australians Are Giving Less

Wendy Williams

Thursday, 14th June 2018 at 8:00 am

The Need for Leadership to Address White Supremacy in the NGO Sector

Luke Michael

Thursday, 14th June 2018 at 8:53 am

Full-Time Work No Longer A Reality for Young Australians

Wendy Williams

Thursday, 14th June 2018 at 8:48 am

Record Number of Women Honoured in Queen’s Birthday Awards

Wendy Williams

Monday, 11th June 2018 at 12:05 am

Salary Survey 2018
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!