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How Your Brand Can Turn Followers into Fans


23 June 2016 at 9:25 am
Staff Reporter
Lali Wiratunga, from Westpac Social Sector Banking speaks with Jenna Moffat from Clickability, who was awarded a Social Change Fellowship, about becoming a champion for people living with a disability and attracting the support of investors and the community.

Staff Reporter | 23 June 2016 at 9:25 am


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How Your Brand Can Turn Followers into Fans
23 June 2016 at 9:25 am

Sponsored: Lali Wiratunga, from Westpac Social Sector Banking speaks with Jenna Moffat from Clickability, who was awarded a Social Change Fellowship, about becoming a champion for people living with a disability and attracting the support of investors and the community.

sports fans

During May, a fairy tale story gripped fans around the world a championship title win in the English Premier League to Leicester City, the little guys in the league. Andrea Bocelli, renowned Italian tenor, and long-time football follower was also swept up in the momentum built by Leicester City, and offered his services to perform at their coronation ceremony.

He told La Gazzetta della Sport: “They [Leicester City] are an extraordinary example of clean football, a small team becoming great thanks to the strength of the group spirit…How do you tell me not to get caught [up in all of this]?”

I wondered: can anyone become a champion in their field and make maestros and fans want to sing their praises?

Jenna Moffat from Clickability has some first-hand experience of doing just that. Along with co-founder, Aviva Beecher Kelk, Jenna was among 12 individuals chosen by Westpac Bicentennial Foundation as an inaugural Social Change Fellow, receiving an investment in her personal development and education. The Bicentennial Foundation is investing in her, as an individual with demonstrated capacity to achieve social change. Westpac is a fan.

I spoke with Moffat about how Clickability is becoming a champion for people living with a disability and attracting the support of investors and the community.

What is Clickability?

Clickability is an Australian online disability service directory that features ratings and reviews from the people who actually use the services. Users can find service providers, share their experiences and connect with others about issues that matter to them.

What’s one story that underpins why Clickability needs to exist?

I tell people about a friend of ours who received a terrible service; he’s a wheelchair user and one night recently a new support worker was sent to help him into bed. This support worker didn’t have the training to support him properly and it just wasn’t safe for him to go to bed. So he didn’t. He stayed in his chair for 27 hours. This isn’t good enough, but it happens all the time. We’re supporting people to share their experiences. There are a lot of great services out there, and they need to be celebrated and heard about. Service providers need to start listening to customers and so we’re providing a place where these new conversations can happen.

You and Aviva are both social workers and have a long history of working with people with a disability. How have your values been embedded in Clickability?  

Every single member of our team believes deeply in our vision of equality in consumer choice and control of disability support services. Everything we do, we do with honesty and a genuine spirit. This comes out in our actions we’re active in the community and contribute to things that matter to us like our involvement in the Willing to Work Inquiry. We even coined a term, “relationshipping” we believe that good relationshipping can change the world and so we put energy and time into all of the interactions we have. Every person who interacts with Clickability is making a difference and we want them to know that!

It sounds like you a building more than simply access to your services, you are building an emotional connection. How are you doing that?

We “walk the walk” and employ people with disability. We want everyone to know the people who sit behind Clickability and so we show pictures and videos of us whenever we can. We get to know our customers well, whether they are a reviewer or a service provider. We listen carefully, ask questions and clarify what they want and need.

We want people to feel ownership over the website. Our customers contribute reviews and content, so they are also responsible for how useful the website is. It becomes everyone’s responsibility to see it succeed and grow! With every interaction, people are investing in its success. And we keep the language throughout the website and in our communications clear, non-jargon, passionate and accessible.

And what makes people return users of your service? How are you creating loyalty?

Clickability is young, fun and a bit cheeky but we’re also well informed and are getting stuff done. People continue to use our website because they trust us to provide good quality information. We respond to feedback this includes admitting when we’re wrong, and doing better every time.

Although the NDIS is really exciting, it’s also really scary and daunting; we’re bringing a sense of lightness, energy and optimism which people are responding really well to.

Westpac Social Change Fellowship applications open 27 June 2016 and close 19 August. For more information visit westpac.com.au/200years



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