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CAUSEE Project - Tracking Australia's Entrepreneurs


14 December 2007 at 2:37 pm
Staff Reporter
Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is about to begin the largest study of business start-ups ever undertaken in Australia, and the only large-scale study to track entrepreneurs and ventures over time.

Staff Reporter | 14 December 2007 at 2:37 pm


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CAUSEE Project - Tracking Australia's Entrepreneurs
14 December 2007 at 2:37 pm

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is about to begin the largest study of business start-ups ever undertaken in Australia, and the only large-scale study to track entrepreneurs and ventures over time.

CAUSEE, or the Comprehensive Australian Study of Entrepreneurial Emergence research project is an opportunity to fundamentally improve the understanding of independent entrepreneurship in Australia.

The study plans to identify a large sample of emerging (but not yet operating) business start-ups, and will track them over four years.

CAUSEE is focused on following start-up businesses from their inception

The project also plans to identify newly established young firms that have commenced trading. In addition, high potential, high growth firms will also be sought as a separate sample.

The CAUSEE research project is funded by two grants from the Australian Research Council, and contributions from BDO-Kendalls and National Australia Bank (NAB).

Researcher Julienne Senyard says the project will follow some 1500 new firms in an effort to better understand what works and what doesn’t when starting and developing new businesses.

Senyard says the study has two main categories of businesses – what is called nascent ventures, essentially businesses in an active start-up phase but not yet trading, and young firms up to 4 years old (commenced trading from 2004).

She says most of the businesses will be a random sample of Australian businesses generated from a telephone survey.

However, CAUSEE is also looking to find separately a sample of high potential firms – firms that have the potential to grow and be successful quickly (in terms of sales or employment).

Previous research has shown that these firms are a very small percentage of business start ups and as such, are very difficult to find.

Researchers are hoping that corporates across Australia can help by identifying either individuals or companies that they are assisting as mentors or board members or by providing informal advice.

Senyard says that many of the entrepreneurs who have already completed the survey found it very helpful because it makes them think about what they are doing and potentially things they should be doing.

If the business qualifies and the full survey is completed, the entrepreneur goes into a draw to win $5000. By choosing to participate, all respondents have access to a range of web resources which may assist them and allow them to grow.

CAUSEE also plans to provide specific feedback to organisations that choose to participate in the high potential research.

Specific details of business IP is not sought ( the research is looking at the process of start up) and in line with Australian Research guidelines and QUT ethics, all information will be kept completely confidential and details will not be used for any other purpose other than this research.

For further information please go to our website www.causee.bus.qut.edu.au
or contact Julienne Senyard via email at j.senyard@qut.edu.au or call on +617 3138 7547.



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