Equity
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
NEWS  | 

Lack of Workplace Support Costing Jobs: SANE Australia


Thursday, 25th August 2011 at 1:02 pm
Staff Reporter
A new study by SANE Australia finds that most Australians with a mental illness receive little support at work, and more than half those surveyed did not believe their manager had an understanding of mental illness and its impact in the workplace.

Thursday, 25th August 2011
at 1:02 pm
Staff Reporter


1 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Lack of Workplace Support Costing Jobs: SANE Australia
Thursday, 25th August 2011 at 1:02 pm

A new study by SANE Australia finds that most Australians with a mental illness receive little support at work, and more than half those surveyed did not believe their manager had an understanding of mental illness and its impact in the workplace.

The survey by national mental health charity SANE Australia found that 95 per cent of respondents said employers and managers needed education on mental illness, and training on how to manage its effects in the workplace.

While more than 60 percent of respondents reported that their mental illness had not been a barrier for them in finding a job, the majority said that no support had been provided to them once they were in a job.

SANE Australia’s Executive Director, Barbara Hocking says that with one in five Australians experiencing some form of mental illness every year, the report reveals a significant number of people who face difficulties in the workplace.

Hocking says the survey paints a concerning and unsatisfactory picture of Australian workplaces with many employees, including those who care for a family member with a mental illness, being disadvantaged by a lack of flexibility, such as being able to work part-time, to work from home at times or to have adjustments made in the workplace.

As a result, she says businesses lose experienced employees and have to spend time and money investing in new people.

SANE Australia’s Working life and mental illness study found that three quarters of the 520 respondents surveyed had never received information or help from government programs designed to assist workers to maintain their job.

The report says the survey reveals an encouraging sign that two thirds of respondents had disclosed their illness to their employer or manager. Not disclosing, often because of fear of losing a job, increases stress and prevents access to the very support that can promote successful employment.

According to Hocking there is an overwhelming need for education and training in the workplace about mental illness and its effects.

She says Australia needs “mentally healthy workplaces” where stigma is reduced and employees with a mental illness can ask for support without prejudice and to work with employers, managers and co-workers to reduce the misunderstanding and stress associated with mental illness, so it is treated in the same way as physical illness.

As Federal Minister for Mental Health, Mark Butler, has acknowledged, Australia employs fewer people with a mental illness than many other countries.

The Research Bulletin’s findings support recommendations SANE Australia made in a recent submission to the Senate Inquiry into mental health and workforce participation. In its submission, SANE Australia called for:

  • The removal of barriers to employment;
  • Ongoing support to find and keep a job;
  • Improved access to employment agencies and rehabilitation services;
  • Improvements to enable greater ease of disclosure and
  • Workplace education enabling managers and co-workers to supervise, work alongside and – when necessary – to support a colleague with a mental illness.

Click here to view Research Bulletin – Working life and mental illness or go to www.sane.org




Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

One Comment

  • John says:

    Who were the respondents,how many of the respondents were actually people with a (subjective) mental illness, as opposed to the carers caring for the person labelled with a mental illness, I don't know anyone on psychotropics that works at any full time job, some work part time, im sure there are some out there who can cope with the amount of poison their on, but the majority cant, and for the person who cares and works it must be a nightmare, im a carer and i haven't even been able to work for the last two years because my loved one is being forced to take poison that has all the side effects of any mental illness you want to mention, and when it stops working because of tolerance and the fact it actually makes you mad they end up electrocuting the victim, and once that happens no one is working because they are traumatized, the victim terrorized and dumbed down and vegetated,depressed, and made ratty, that's us, that's our experience, our reality

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Therapy Chickens Bring Joy to Aged Care Home

Maggie Coggan

Friday, 15th March 2019 at 4:52 pm

Drugs and Alcohol a Coping Mechanism for Bullied Teens

Maggie Coggan

Monday, 4th March 2019 at 5:02 pm

Government Invests $1.45B into Community Mental Health

Luke Michael

Friday, 18th January 2019 at 4:06 pm

Bringing New Meaning to the Classic Wrist Watch

Contributor

Tuesday, 11th December 2018 at 7:30 am

POPULAR

Cafe Roasted for ‘Appalling’ Sign Mocking Disability Abuse

Luke Michael

Thursday, 7th March 2019 at 5:18 pm

The ‘Hidden Gem’ of Philanthropy

Wendy Williams

Tuesday, 19th March 2019 at 8:44 am

Advocacy Groups Struggle Amid Growing NDIS Waiting Lists

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 20th March 2019 at 11:46 am

Disability Housing Conference
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!