Good 360
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES FOR THE COMMON GOOD
NEWS  |  Corporate Engagement, Good Business

‘Vending Machine’ Recycling Plan for Australia


Wednesday, 17th April 2013 at 11:45 am
Staff Reporter
International recycling companies have announced the delivery of a modern recycling system to Australia that they say will result in the recycling around 5 billion containers annually that would otherwise end up in landfill.


Wednesday, 17th April 2013
at 11:45 am
Staff Reporter


3 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
‘Vending Machine’ Recycling Plan for Australia
Wednesday, 17th April 2013 at 11:45 am

International recycling companies have announced the delivery of a modern recycling system to Australia that they say will result in the recycling around 5 billion containers annually that would otherwise end up in landfill.

The proposed Container Deposit System (CDS) will work as a ‘reverse vending machine’ facility located at approximately 1,400 points across the nation close to large supermarkets, according to the proposal.

CEO of European based TOMRA, one of the participating international companies, Stefan Ranstrand said that based on the experience in over 30 markets a well-designed CDS would provide significant economic returns as well as community benefits.

The plan is expected to create more than 3000 jobs as well as a predicted capital influx of $500m into sustainable infrastructure.

Revive Recycling Chief Executive, Markus Fraval said: “A CDS in Australia will reclaim at least 5 billion containers that are currently lost to litter or landfill every year, and that are conservatively estimated to be worth around $120 to $140 million annually.”

In Germany, both consumers and retailers were quick to embrace the system once it was fully implemented in 2006, according to Carsten Schleeberger, Head of Deposit Systems at Rhenus who are also involved in the Australian introduction.

“Recycling rates are now consistently over 95%, and it is providing local industry with
high quality material that adds significant local economic value.”

Managing Director of Envirobank Recycling Narelle Anderson said that the CDS trial in the Northern Territory gave remote Australian communities economic benefits.

“Those on marginal incomes now have the opportunity to supplement their incomes,
easing cost of living pressures, by collecting containers at 10c each,” she said.

The international recycling companies involved in the proposal are currently discussing investment opportunities with Federal and State Governments as well as industry stakeholders.
 



FEATURED SUPPLIERS


HLB Mann Judd is a specialist Accounting and Advisory firm t...

HLB Mann Judd

...


NGO Recruitment is Australia’s not-for-profit sector recru...

NGO Recruitment

Brennan IT helps not-for-profit (NFP) organisations drive gr...

Brennan IT

More Suppliers

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

World’s Biggest Mining Company Sides with Enviro Groups in Advocacy Standoff

Wendy Williams

Thursday, 9th November 2017 at 12:55 pm

One to Watch: Daniel Smith

Wendy Williams

Tuesday, 31st October 2017 at 8:31 am

The Seaside Scavenges Helping To Clean Australia’s Beaches

Luke Michael

Monday, 23rd October 2017 at 8:21 am

POPULAR

Red Cross Moves to Wage-Based Fundraising Model

Lina Caneva

Thursday, 16th November 2017 at 8:30 am

Concerns Raised Over New ACNC Board Appointments

Luke Michael

Monday, 20th November 2017 at 2:28 pm

New Same-Sex Marriage Bill Looks to Protect Faith-Based Charities

Luke Michael

Monday, 13th November 2017 at 5:25 pm

Adelaide at the Vanguard of Ending Street Homelessness Globally

Wendy Williams

Tuesday, 21st November 2017 at 8:43 am

3 Comments

  • Anonymous Anonymous says:

    The reluctance of the Environment Ministers and the Federal Government to adopt a policy on compulsory CDS nation wide is a continuing gift to the packaging industry, who up their annual scare campaigns with monotonous regularity about the enormous cost we will have to pay at the deli or the bottle shop for our can of coke or bottle of beer. What is never explained is why those goods don’t cost more in Adelaide, where a CDS is in place,
    than they do in Perth, where no CDS currenlty exists.

    The reverse cycle vending machines have been around for a while . Great idea for public place recycling, but not going to cut the mustard for home consumption. The other issue to watch out for is the development of a partnership with a major grocery chain – and the deposit is refunded not in cash but in vouchers for that store only.

    A CDS is a great opportunity for NFPs to make a few dollars for their cause. Again, see SA’s system – especially in the regions. But lets not stop at beverages. Anything in a container could well have a deposit applied to it, whether it’s your soup stock in high quality cardboard or your glass jar of jam. Ensuring that the packaging material is not so complex it can’t readily be disassembled is a critical component of an effective CDS.

  • Steve1424 Steve1424 says:

    Container deposit is the most effective way to increase recycling and reduce litter, as SA has shown for 35 years, and these programs are in place around the world. CDS would quickly double to triple current recycling rates, and reduce litter on our streets, waterways, and ocean. Requiring the use of more returnable bottles for refill should also be a consideration.

  • Anonymous Anonymous says:

    Everyone should boycott coke products and disable vending machines with an “Out of Order” sign. Only when Coke’s profits are hit,will they change their tune. They are the reason there is not a CDS in every state and territory or a national CDS. They fight CDS in every country they do business in. Disgusting.

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Good 360
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

The social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!