Subscribe to News
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
News  |  Fundraising

Dolly Parton Brings Books Down Under


Tuesday, 11th February 2014 at 9:26 am
Staff Reporter
United Way Australia has joined forces with US singing icon Dolly Parton to help inspire Aussie pre-school children and their parents to read.

Tuesday, 11th February 2014
at 9:26 am
Staff Reporter


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Dolly Parton Brings Books Down Under
Tuesday, 11th February 2014 at 9:26 am

United Way Australia has joined forces with US singing icon Dolly Parton to help inspire Aussie pre-school children and their parents to read.

Dolly Parton is in Australia to launch the Dolly Parton Imagination Library – a charitable program that aims to improve the literacy of children in disadvantaged communities.

The Imagination Library promises to deliver one free age-appropriate book per month to children aged 0 – 5. Currently the Dollywood Foundation says 735,000 children receive a free book each month and so far she and her local partners have gifted over 56,000,000 books to children in four countries.

In Australia, The Dolly Parton Imagination Library is to be run by United Way Australia which will be working with Rotary and Penguin Children’s Books to deliver free books to as many children as possible.

“We are very excited to be launching Imagination Library in Australia and hope to help up to 40,000 families tackle the issue of early reading deficiencies,” CEO of United Way Australia, Doug Taylor said.

“Already hundreds of children and parents have registered with the Imagination Library as part of our pilot program that will operate in six communities across the country.

“We hope with support and commitment of communities, businesses and individuals, we will be able to extend this reading program to many more disadvantaged communities across Australia.  

“Australian statistics reveal that up to one in five local school students are not ready to start school when enrolled. Whilst studies show that lower literacy and education levels can be a precursor to social issues such as unemployment and poverty – commonly leading to a cycle of disadvantage.

Either there are no banners, they are disabled or none qualified for this location!

“If you can read, you can learn about anything,” Parton said at the launch. “If your actions create a legacy that inspires others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, then, you are an excellent leader,” he said. 


Staff Reporter  |  Journalist  |  @ProBonoNews



Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au


Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Philanthropic giant steps up for bushfire crisis

Maggie Coggan

Thursday, 9th January 2020 at 3:15 pm

Top philanthropic gifts of 2019

Maggie Coggan

Wednesday, 18th December 2019 at 5:33 pm

Participatory grantmaking: Can we afford not to do it?

Contributor

Monday, 16th December 2019 at 4:17 pm

POPULAR

How are Aussie charities helping in the bushfire crisis?

Luke Michael

Tuesday, 7th January 2020 at 3:21 pm

What impact will the bushfire crisis have on homelessness?

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 15th January 2020 at 4:28 pm

The rise (and scepticism) of Facebook fundraisers

Maggie Coggan

Thursday, 16th January 2020 at 8:49 am

What about the charities?

Maggie Coggan

Wednesday, 8th January 2020 at 1:26 pm

Subscribe to News
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!