Dumbo Feather
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
Opinion  |  Social AffairsEnvironment

When the weather means more than record temperatures and sunscreen


Monday, 19th August 2019 at 4:58 pm
Esther Abram
We need to start talking about climate change in all aspects of our lives, writes Esther Abram, green giving manager at the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network.


Monday, 19th August 2019
at 4:58 pm
Esther Abram


1 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
When the weather means more than record temperatures and sunscreen
Monday, 19th August 2019 at 4:58 pm

We need to start talking about climate change in all aspects of our lives, writes Esther Abram, green giving manager at the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network.

Complaining about the weather is a popular topic of conversation. In a time when political or cultural topics can be divisive, it’s a risk-free way of making a connection with friends and strangers alike.

But these innocuous conversations increasingly contain a level of disquiet. We marvel at the prospect of London baking in 40 degree-plus temperatures and commiserate over the plight of farmers experiencing long droughts then massive floods. And then there is a pause in the conversation. More frequently now I fill this gap with the statement “and that’s climate change”.

Having a sensible conversation in Australia about climate change at a national government level has become more difficult in recent decades. Tragically this has occurred at the very time when taking action on climate change would have the lowest costs. Timing is critical as the longer we delay action, the more emissions are released into the atmosphere and the hotter the earth becomes.

When it comes to planet Earth, David Attenborough is the most credible witness of its wonders and decline. Attenborough is an entertainer not an activist, but he’s raising his voice to call to the leaders of the world that the time for prevarication is over. Destructive deforestation and burning coal for electricity can’t be part of our future. But he also tells us that the solutions are here.

In my role with the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network (AEGN), I see a steady flow of philanthropists coming on board with deep concern about climate change and the legacy we are leaving our children. They fund terrific initiatives and support communities and people of all types to advocate on climate change. This keeps me optimistic about the future. But with the size of the challenge, everyone needs to be on board.

Which gets us back to talking about the weather. We need to start talking about climate change in all aspects of our lives. Climate change exposes every one of us to higher levels of risk of illness or injury due to extreme weather. Many of the people philanthropy supports are extremely vulnerable, because of poor housing, poverty or existing health conditions. But this is not just a one-way street – we can all reduce emissions and we can take action to adapt to climate change.

Philanthropy is recognising that a wide number of charitable purpose areas are impacted by climate change. The AEGN is launching the Introduction to a Climate Lens publication at the Philanthropy Meets Parliament Summit in September. We’re getting the conversation going and would love you to join us.

About the author: Esther Abram is green giving manager at the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network.


Esther Abram  |  @ProBonoNews

Esther Abram is green giving manager at the Australian Environmental Grantmakers Network.


Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

One Comment

  • Emma-Kate says:

    I noted that the Board of CERES recently declared a climate emergency. I think many more organisations should do so, and not wait for local, state and federal governments to take the lead. It’s so encouraging to see Philanthropy take a leading role in this space too. Congratulations to the AEGN for doing so!

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Striking for a better future

Wendy Williams

Monday, 16th September 2019 at 8:33 am

New fund offers long-term support for rural communities after a disaster

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 11th September 2019 at 5:14 pm

AMA labels climate change a ‘health emergency’

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 4th September 2019 at 5:05 pm

POPULAR

Disability royal commission faces boycott threat

Luke Michael

Monday, 16th September 2019 at 4:37 pm

Eight things you need to know about the future of legacy giving

Wendy Williams

Thursday, 12th September 2019 at 8:27 am

Disability pension pushing Indigenous Australians into poverty

Maggie Coggan

Wednesday, 18th September 2019 at 5:26 pm

Dumbo Feather
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook
dumbofeather

Giveaway time! Simply enter your email for your chance to win a Limited Edition Gift Bundle from our friends at Dumbo Feather.

 Count me in 

You have Successfully Subscribed!