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Why big little brush?


3 March 2020 at 7:15 am
Contributor
It’s easy to take for granted the resources we have at our disposal, but having access to health and hygiene resources can lead to better outcomes for entire communities, writes social enterprise big little brush.


Contributor | 3 March 2020 at 7:15 am


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Why big little brush?
3 March 2020 at 7:15 am

It’s easy to take for granted the resources we have at our disposal, but having access to health and hygiene resources can lead to better outcomes for entire communities, writes social enterprise big little brush.

We probably all agree that healthcare is a basic human right. Hygiene resources are a key part of this. Every day, we get to stay healthy by washing our hands, taking a shower and brushing our teeth (which is where big little brush come in!)

It’s easy to take for granted the resources we have at our disposal: a bulk billing doctor to call, a hot shower in the morning or a toothbrush to keep your gums and teeth healthy. Our founder Joel Hanna definitely fell into that trap. He let a busted wisdom tooth go untreated, not because he didn’t know where to get help, but because he knew he had a safety net. He could visit the dentist whenever he chose to, so why rush?

After the immense pain subsided (and not to mention the sting of a hefty dentist’s bill) Joel realised that there were probably people going through the same experience, only without access to a dentist or dental resources. He realised that the outcome of his story would have been very different if he lived in a remote community here in Australia. And so, big little brush was born.

The profits from every big little brush you buy directly fund and support health and hygiene projects in remote communities. This is done in tandem with Red Dust who’ve spent 30 years building health and wellbeing knowledge in remote communities to improve the overall morbidity rates. When you buy a big little brush, it’s not just your smile that’s benefitting!

Bridging the Gap has found that there’s a 10-year gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Health and hygiene are key factors for life expectancy and quality of life. Think about what you could experience, the memories you could make with 10 extra years. 

Having access to health and hygiene resources gives people the dignity they deserve, keeps kids in school and leads to better outcomes for entire communities.

Together, we can help all Australians have access to the same opportunities. Together, we can change the world.



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