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Fees Waived Under New Vic Association Laws


26 September 2013 at 4:09 pm
Staff Reporter
Incorporated associations and some sporting clubs in Victoria will get their fees waived or reduced for changing their rules, as long as they do it before November 26, according to Consumer Affairs Victoria.

Staff Reporter | 26 September 2013 at 4:09 pm


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Fees Waived Under New Vic Association Laws
26 September 2013 at 4:09 pm

Incorporated associations and some sporting clubs in Victoria will get their fees waived or reduced for changing their rules, as long as they do it before November 26, according to Consumer Affairs Victoria.

New laws for Victoria’s 38,000 incorporated associations were introduced last year which affect many local organisations such as sporting clubs and religious groups.

Director of Consumer Affairs Victoria, Claire Noone, said the normal fee of $160.50 to adopt the government’s new model rules, under the Associations Incorporation Reform Act 2012, is being waived to give associations time to adjust.

“Now is an excellent time for local organisations to consider their options on whether they want the model rules or their own set of rules, so they can take advantage of the reduced fees,” Dr Noone said.

“All incorporated associations must have a set of rules that cover matters such as membership requirements, annual general meetings, grievance procedures and financial reporting – the model rules make it easier for many clubs to comply with the law.

“For those associations that have developed their own rules, the fee for changing these rules will also be reduced to $75.20 until 26 November.

“Associations that choose to do nothing will be still required to learn about the new model rules, as some of the changes to incorporated association laws may impact their rules.

“I urge all association office bearers and committee members to make sure they understand the changes now, before the end of the transition period.”

Changes in the new laws affect how an association’s secretary and other office bearers are appointed, who can have access to the association’s records, and using technology to hold a meeting without all being in the same location.

“Consumer Affairs Victoria has written to each registered association about the new laws and held more than 190 presentations across the state,” Dr Noone said.

Becoming an incorporated association is a voluntary process whereby a Not for Profit club or community group can apply to become a 'legal person' and a distinct legal entity that continues regardless of changes to its membership.

To identify an incorporated association, they’ll have the word “Incorporated” or “Inc” after their name.

The new rules can be found here.


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