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beyondblue Releases Youth-focussed App


27 June 2014 at 1:46 pm
Staff Reporter
Depression Not for Profit beyondblue has launched a mobile app, which aims to make it easier for young people to start conversations with friends who they are concerned may be experiencing depression or anxiety.

Staff Reporter | 27 June 2014 at 1:46 pm


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beyondblue Releases Youth-focussed App
27 June 2014 at 1:46 pm

Depression Not for Profit beyondblue has launched a mobile app, which aims to make it easier for young people to start conversations with friends who they are concerned may be experiencing depression or anxiety.

The Check-In App, developed by app development agency Two Bulls, was a result of beyondblue winning the 2013 Vodafone Foundation App Aid competition after receiving more than 700 crowd-funded donations.

beyondblue raised more than $16,500 on the crowdfunding website Pozible, which was matched by a donation of $10,000 from the Vodafone Foundation and a bonus $25,000 for winning the competition by having the most supporters.

The free App, which can be downloaded from the App Store on iTunes or the Google Play store, allows young people to choose options to construct a unique, step-by-step plan for approaching a friend they are worried about.

The App provides a range of things young people can say to their friend, and where and when they can say it, along with tips from other young people who’ve reached out to a friend.

Users are also able to review how their planned conversation went, set reminders to follow up with their friend, and access ideas about what to do next, particularly if things didn’t go well.

beyondblue acting CEO Dr Brian Graetz said young people often avoid asking friends if they were going through a difficult time because they’re afraid they’ll say the wrong thing or make the situation worse.

“The Check-in App is designed to take the fear out of talking to a friend about why they seem down or stressed, or have stopped doing things that they usually enjoy,” he said.

“Research shows that one in four young people aged 16 to 24 will experience a mental illness, but only a quarter of those will seek support from a health professional. This is extremely worrying, as suicide is the biggest killer of young Australians, and each year accounts for the deaths of more young people than car accidents.

“While there is no substitute for professional help, checking on a friend can be a powerful step towards them seeking the support they need.”

beyondblue said throughout the development of the Check-in app, young people from around Australia, who had experienced depression or anxiety, had provided feedback.

For more information about App Aid, click here.



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