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Hiring Managers Want Someone Just Like Them – Study


Monday, 27th October 2014 at 10:46 am
Xavier Smerdon, Journalist
Male hiring managers prefer male job candidates and female hiring managers prefer female job candidates, but when it comes to making the final hiring decision a man is more likely to be hired, a new study has revealed.

Monday, 27th October 2014
at 10:46 am
Xavier Smerdon, Journalist


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Hiring Managers Want Someone Just Like Them – Study
Monday, 27th October 2014 at 10:46 am

Male hiring managers prefer male job candidates and female hiring managers prefer female job candidates, but when it comes to making the final hiring decision a man is more likely to be hired, a new study has revealed.  

In the study released by recruiting experts Hays in conjunction with diversity and employee survey organisation Insync Surveys, 515 hiring managers were asked to review the resume of ‘Susan’ while another 514 reviewed the identical CV with the name changed to ‘Simon’. The hiring managers were then asked how well 20 attributes described the applicants.

Female respondents who received the CV of ‘Susan’ said she matched 14 of the 20 attributes extremely well. In comparison, female respondents who received the CV of ‘Simon’ said he matched 6 of the 20 attributes extremely well.

Male hiring managers demonstrated the same bias; they said ‘Simon’ matched 14 of the 20 attributes extremely well, while ‘Susan’ matched only 6 of the 20 attributes.

According to Hays, such bias is known as affinity bias, or in other words, hiring managers have a preference for more highly rating the candidates most like themselves.  

“A hiring manager is unlikely to openly come out and tell us they want to hire someone who is just like them,” Managing Director of Hays in Australia & New Zealand Nick Deligiannis said.

“But affinity bias is the reason that many people unconsciously rate higher the candidate who is the most like them.

“At Hays, we witness thousands of selection and hiring decisions every day. We undertook this research with Insync Surveys to look at the way these decisions are made since gender diversity has yet to be achieved in Australia/New Zealand. We wanted to look at the part gender bias plays in the process, and were curious to know how hiring managers would decide between two equally qualified candidates, one male and one female.

“It seems that gender beliefs bias a range of decisions, including when we recruit. When the majority of executive positions are currently held by men, affinity bias is an obvious barrier in women’s ability to achieve such positions in equal numbers to men. It affects our perceptions and makes a difference when we’re rating candidates.

“But when it comes to making a hiring decision, it is gender bias that affects the outcome.  Our study also found that both genders were significantly more likely to interview and hire ‘Simon’ rather than ‘Susan’. This shows that the ‘think leader, think male’ bias comes into play for both male and female recruiting managers.

“The results have been insightful, and we hope will spark continued dialogue about gender diversity in Australia.”

Insync Surveys CEO Nicholas Barnett said affinity bias ultimately worked against women.

“Affinity bias is a desire to be part of the ‘in-crowd’, it involves being surrounded by colleagues who make us feel comfortable because they are like us,” Barnett said.

“For the ‘in crowd’ respect is automatically given, opportunities are granted and obstacles are removed. Unfortunately in a male dominated environment women with similar skills have to earn respect before it’s given.

“In a hiring sense, the affinity bias revealed in our Hays/Insync Surveys study means that males will continue to hire more males than females unless those hiring understand the unconscious biases they hold and implement strategies to overcome them.”

The full report can be found here.


Xavier Smerdon  |  Journalist |  @XavierSmerdon

Xavier Smerdon is a journalist specialising in the Not for Profit sector. He writes breaking and investigative news articles.

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