Good 360
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES FOR THE COMMON GOOD
NEWS  |  General, Research

Australia’s Youngest Generation is the Most Vulnerable Says Report


Friday, 10th June 2016 at 10:28 am
Wendy Williams, Journalist
A new report is calling for governments to set a clear national agenda for children as it claims Australia’s youngest generation is the most vulnerable.

Friday, 10th June 2016
at 10:28 am
Wendy Williams, Journalist


1 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Australia’s Youngest Generation is the Most Vulnerable Says Report
Friday, 10th June 2016 at 10:28 am

A new report is calling for governments to set a clear national agenda for children as it claims Australia’s youngest generation is the most vulnerable.

Child poverty

One in six children in Australia still lives below the poverty line

The report, from the Australian Child Rights Taskforce, led by UNICEF Australia and the National Children’s and Youth Law Centre, highlights that despite two decades of consecutive economic growth, one in six children in Australia still lives below the poverty line.

It also found that more than 70,000 children received assistance from specialist homelessness services, with no view of a long term solution.   

The launch of the Australian Child Rights Progress Report on Friday marks 25 years since Australia ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, agreeing to a set of standards and obligations for all children.

According to UNICEF Australia while considerable progress has been made in protecting child rights in Australia, there are a number of entrenched challenges that still need to be addressed.

UNICEF Australia chief executive officer Adrian Graham said the report, which considers the progress – or lack thereof –  for children across a number of key social policy areas including family life, education and care and justice and health, shows Australia is not the lucky country for many children.

“This report confirms that discrimination is persistent for some children growing up in Australia and that their lives are not getting any easier,” Graham said.

“Children living in poverty have less access to both primary and specialist health services than the general population, higher levels of contact with the criminal justice system and greater exposure to domestic violence.

“Children living in poverty are also more likely to be removed from their families and placed into care arrangements.

“Australia is not the lucky country for many children.”

In particular, the report identifies that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children,lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex (LGBTI) children, children from rural areas, children with disabilities and children from migrant backgrounds are still more likely to experience poverty, discrimination, social exclusion and disadvantage.

Other key findings include:

  • Only 74 per cent of 20 to 24-year olds from low socioeconomic backgrounds complete Year 12 or equivalent, compared with 94 per cent of 20 to 24-year olds from high socioeconomic backgrounds.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people account for 25 per cent of the homeless population, while making up just 2.5 per cent of the general population.
  • 9.3 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are living in poverty, compared to 12.4 per cent of non- indigenous children.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are 9.2 times more likely to be in out of home care than non-Indigenous children.
  • In 1990 there were 3 per 1,000 children in out of home care. In 2014 this had grown to 8.1 per 1,000 children.
  • In 1991, of the children placed in out of home care, 16 per cent were in institutional care, compared to 6 per cent in 2014.
  • 75 per cent of the children in residential care who have been subject to sexual abuse are female.
  • The level of over-representation of Indigenous people aged 10 – 17 years in detention increased from 19 times the rate of non-Indigenous young people in 2011 to 26 times in 2015.
  • Young people who have been homeless have a mental (79.9 per cent) or physical (61.2 per cent) disability. This figure is 55.6 per cent for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.
  • 12 times as many children under 18 years of age used the email legal advice service between 2010 – 2014, rather than traditional legal services.

Graham said the report serves as a reminder that no child should be left behind and the Taskforce, the peak body for child rights in Australia, is now calling on the government to set an agenda for children.

“The well-being of children should be shaped by sound leadership and policy choices,” Graham said.

“The Australian Child Rights Progress Report is a clear reminder that Australia must place equity at the heart of our agenda for children, with the idea that no child should be left behind.

“The Taskforce calls on the Australian government to adopt a comprehensive national policy agenda for children that include measures to ensure that all children growing up in Australia have a decent quality of life.”


Wendy Williams  |  Journalist |  @ProBonoNews

Wendy Williams is a journalist specialising in the Not for Profit sector.

FEATURED SUPPLIERS


...


HLB Mann Judd is a specialist Accounting and Advisory firm t...

HLB Mann Judd

Helping the helpers fund their mission…...

FrontStream Pty Ltd (FrontStream AsiaPacific)

Yes we’re lawyers, but we do a lot more....

Moores

More Suppliers

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Calls for Stronger Stand Against Child Violence

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 1st November 2017 at 5:06 pm

The Bottom 100 Shines a Light on the World’s Poor

Wendy Williams

Wednesday, 21st June 2017 at 4:59 pm

Young People Taking Charge

Wendy Williams

Monday, 8th May 2017 at 8:42 am

Australia’s Asylum Seeker Policies Cost Taxpayers $9.6B Over Three Years

Wendy Williams

Tuesday, 13th September 2016 at 10:43 am

POPULAR

Red Cross Moves to Wage-Based Fundraising Model

Lina Caneva

Thursday, 16th November 2017 at 8:30 am

Disability Advocacy Group Fights to Restore State Funding

Luke Michael

Thursday, 9th November 2017 at 8:37 am

New Same-Sex Marriage Bill Looks to Protect Faith-Based Charities

Luke Michael

Monday, 13th November 2017 at 5:25 pm

Concerns Raised Over New ACNC Board Appointments

Luke Michael

Monday, 20th November 2017 at 2:28 pm

One Comment

  • ForgottenAustralianFamily says:

    The question that is still not being asked: How many prison inmates were in care
    as children?

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Good 360
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!