Bushfire Appeals
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
News  |  CultureA lighter note

Thirsty? These seaweed pouches could be the water bottles of the future


Saturday, 11th May 2019 at 12:00 pm
Maggie Coggan
Runners in this year’s London Marathon were given a quench thirster with a twist – edible seaweed pouches carrying sports-drink – in a bid to cut down on plastic water bottles at the event.    


Saturday, 11th May 2019
at 12:00 pm
Maggie Coggan


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Thirsty? These seaweed pouches could be the water bottles of the future
Saturday, 11th May 2019 at 12:00 pm

Runners in this year’s London Marathon were given a quench thirster with a twist – edible seaweed pouches carrying sports-drink – in a bid to cut down on plastic water bottles at the event.    

In 2018, almost 1 million plastic water bottles were handed out to runners during the race.

By switching to the seaweed pouches, organisers of this year’s race, which took place at the end of April, cut down the number of plastic bottles by around 200,000.

The pouches, called Oohoo, were developed by a London based start-up, Skipping Rocks Lab, and can be bitten to release the liquid inside and then eaten entirely.  

If the tasteless seaweed film is not eaten, it will break down within six weeks, a serious reduction from the 450 years it takes for a plastic water bottle to break down.     

The decision to hand out the pouches at the 23-mile mark followed a successful trial of the product at the Vitality Big Half Marathon in March.

Co-founder of Skipping Rocks Lab, Rodrigo Garcia Gonzalez told CNN having the Oohoo used in the marathon was a milestone for the start-up.

“We are hoping we will demonstrate that it can be used at scale in the future,” Garcia Gonzalez said.

The pouches have also been used at music festivals, where they were filled with alcoholic and sports drinks.

Skipping Rocks Lab is working on eco-friendly alternatives to cling film and the plastic liners used in throwaway coffee cups.

The seaweed pouch initiative was part of a larger sustainability push by the marathon this year, which also saw 700 runners trial water bottle belts made from 90 per cent recycled materials, which can be cleaned and reused.   

The bottle belts were launched in the hope of encouraging runners to carry their own water, changing how hydration is provided at mass participation running events.  

It is estimated that 1 million plastic bottles are purchased per minute, and of these plastic bottles, 91 per cent will not be recycled, with most making their way to landfill.


Maggie Coggan  |  Journalist  |  @MaggieCoggan

Maggie Coggan is a journalist at Pro Bono News covering the social sector.


Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Crafty kid raises bushfire donations from afar

Maggie Coggan

Saturday, 25th January 2020 at 12:00 pm

‘Opera house’ of the natural world rescued in covert operation

Maggie Coggan

Saturday, 18th January 2020 at 12:00 pm

Quirky bushfire fundraisers that took the world by storm

Maggie Coggan

Saturday, 11th January 2020 at 12:00 pm

The Very Hungry (Yolngu) Caterpillar

Maggie Coggan

Saturday, 30th November 2019 at 12:30 pm

POPULAR

NDIS not yet in tune with the needs of participants

Luke Michael

Monday, 20th January 2020 at 4:46 pm

What impact will the bushfire crisis have on homelessness?

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 15th January 2020 at 4:28 pm

The rise (and scepticism) of Facebook fundraisers

Maggie Coggan

Thursday, 16th January 2020 at 8:49 am

New fund paves the way for impact investment in the charity sector

Luke Michael

Friday, 17th January 2020 at 4:34 pm

Bushfire Appeals
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!