Impact 25 Winners
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
NEWS  | 

Australian Consumers Switch Brands to Support Charity


Friday, 2nd December 2011 at 10:45 am
Lina Caneva, Editor
New Australian research shows that companies whose brands, products and services support a charity will win favour with consumers, especially women.

Friday, 2nd December 2011
at 10:45 am
Lina Caneva, Editor


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Australian Consumers Switch Brands to Support Charity
Friday, 2nd December 2011 at 10:45 am

New Australian research shows that companies whose brands, products and services support a charity will win favour with consumers, especially women.

The research found that almost 1/4 of consumers have already switched from their usual product/service to another, in the last year, because of its support of a cause/charity.

The 2011 survey of 1200 consumers, conducted by Di Marzio Research was commissioned by corporate-cause partnership experts, Cavill + Co.

The research also found that women are far more likely to switch than men, and the trend to switch has risen since the GFC in 2008.

Cavill + Co Director, Hailey Cavill says “We asked people to show their level of agreement with this statement: “In the last year I have switched from my usual product/service to another product/service because of its support of a cause of charity.”

“The key finding was that 24 % of Australians have indeed switched brands in the past year because of that brand’s support for a cause or charity,” said Cavill.

“Based on previous research which showed between 48 and 56 per cent of people are willing to switch brands or retailers because they support a cause, this suggests that in any given year, about half of those who are willing to switch will act on that willingness.”

The research found that women are far more likely to switch than men (28% women vs 19% men), and 25-34 year olds are a little more likely to switch.  Consumers in NSW are more likely to switch – 28% vs 20% in Victoria.  Gen Y (18-30 year olds) and pre-boomers (65+) are also more likely to switch.  Those in full time employment and white collar workers are also more likely to switch.

Cavill says the key take-out for marketers is that if you want to resonate with women – get yourself a charity partner and promote it at point of sale!

She says getting the right charity and communicating it correctly are critical however.   

The research data can be found at http://www.cavill.com.au/


Lina Caneva  |  Editor  |  @ProBonoNews

Lina Caneva has been a journalist for more than 35 years, and Editor of Pro Bono Australia News since it was founded in 2000.


Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Tech Giant Launches Foundation to Tackle Indigenous Disadvantage

Luke Michael

Tuesday, 5th March 2019 at 5:09 pm

Less Generalisations, More Nuance Please

Krystian Seibert

Tuesday, 29th January 2019 at 7:55 am

Netflix Cleaning Craze Puts Charities Under Pressure

Maggie Coggan

Wednesday, 16th January 2019 at 5:24 pm

POPULAR

Tech Giant Launches Foundation to Tackle Indigenous Disadvantage

Luke Michael

Tuesday, 5th March 2019 at 5:09 pm

Cafe Roasted for ‘Appalling’ Sign Mocking Disability Abuse

Luke Michael

Thursday, 7th March 2019 at 5:18 pm

Concerns Raised Over Government’s Domestic Violence Plan

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 6th March 2019 at 5:23 pm

The NDIS is Not Medicare

Fran Connelley

Tuesday, 5th March 2019 at 8:31 am

Impact 25 Winners
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!