Community Sector Banking
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
News  |  Policy

NGO Leaders Unite for Disadvantaged Students


Tuesday, 16th April 2013 at 11:06 am
Staff Reporter
Fifteen of Australia's leading non-government community organisations have united for the first time to sign an open letter to COAG calling on State, Territory and Federal Governments to put aside their political differences and put students first.

Tuesday, 16th April 2013
at 11:06 am
Staff Reporter


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
NGO Leaders Unite for Disadvantaged Students
Tuesday, 16th April 2013 at 11:06 am

Fifteen of Australia's leading non-government community organisations have united for the first time to sign an open letter to COAG calling on State, Territory and Federal Governments to put aside their political differences and put students first.

Convened by the Foundation for Young Australians (FYA), ‘NGO Leaders for Educational Opportunity’ includes representatives from FYA’s Centre for New Public Education, The Smith Family, Mission Australia, Brotherhood of St Laurence, ACOSS, Public Education Foundation, Anglicare and others.

As debate rages around Julia Gillard’s proposed National Plan for School Improvement, the NGO Leaders are urging COAG members to step up and see the issue through to resolution.

“This cannot go on any longer. We cannot lose sight of what’s at stake here – the students and their future,” Director of FYA’s Centre for New Public Education, Ricky Campbell-Allen, said.

“Failure to act will see hundreds of thousands of disadvantaged young people let down.”

Meeting on the third anniversary of the announcement of the Review of School Funding, the group was joined by Kathryn Greiner AO, expert panel member of the Gonski Review.

“The Prime Minister’s announcement of the acceptance of the Gonski funding model for education in Australia is akin to the nation building time of the Snowy River scheme,” Greiner said.

“The question Australians need to ask themselves is ‘Can we afford not to have the Gonski recommendations implemented?’, and the answer, simply, is no.”

According to recent data from the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI), one in five Australian children are developmentally vulnerable when they start school. The relationship between Australian children’s low socioeconomic backgrounds and their educational outcomes is stronger than in other high performing OECD countries.

“All Australian Governments have a commitment to supporting young people to realise their full potential,” The Smith Family chief executive, Dr Lisa Smith, said.

“Currently, significant numbers of young Australians, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds, are not achieving key educational outcomes.” 




Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au


Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

A sad and sorry history of Newstart

Luke Michael

Tuesday, 19th November 2019 at 8:00 am

American donors turn to education funding

Luke Michael

Monday, 4th November 2019 at 3:13 pm

Disability royal commission begins amid fears around support services

Luke Michael

Monday, 4th November 2019 at 12:58 pm

Mental health system failing vulnerable Aussies

Luke Michael

Friday, 1st November 2019 at 12:29 pm

POPULAR

A sad and sorry history of Newstart

Luke Michael

Tuesday, 19th November 2019 at 8:00 am

Report finds NFP boards lack leadership in fundraising

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 13th November 2019 at 2:30 pm

Morrison government unveils plan for ‘last 20 per cent’ of NDIS rollout

Luke Michael

Monday, 18th November 2019 at 2:06 pm

Rethinking theory of change

Kevin Robbie

Tuesday, 19th November 2019 at 8:38 am

Community Sector Banking
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!