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Ignored Workers Suffer More than Bullied Workers – Study


Monday, 16th June 2014 at 11:17 am
Staff Reporter
Being ignored at work is worse for physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, a recent study from the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business reveals.

Monday, 16th June 2014
at 11:17 am
Staff Reporter


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Ignored Workers Suffer More than Bullied Workers – Study
Monday, 16th June 2014 at 11:17 am

Being ignored at work is worse for physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, a recent study from the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business reveals.

According to researchers, while most consider ostracism less harmful than bullying, feeling excluded is significantly more likely to lead to job dissatisfaction, quitting and health problems.

“We’ve been taught that ignoring someone is socially preferable–if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all,” study co-author Sauder Professor Sandra Robinson said.

“But ostracism actually leads people to feel more helpless, like they’re not worthy of any attention at all.”

Researchers said through a survey they determined that people consistently rate workplace ostracism as less socially inappropriate, less psychologically harmful and less likely to be prohibited than workplace harassment.

They said additional surveys revealed that people who claimed to have experienced ostracism were significantly more likely to report a degraded sense of workplace belonging and commitment, a stronger intention to quit their job, and a larger proportion of health problems.

The researchers also took an employment survey by a Canadian university that included feedback on feelings of workplace isolation and harassment and compared it to turnover rates three years after the survey was conducted and found that people who reported feeling ostracised were significantly more likely to have quit.

“There is a tremendous effort underway to counter bullying in workplaces and schools, which is definitely important. But abuse is not always obvious,” Robinson said.

“There are many people who feel quietly victimised in their daily lives, and most of our current strategies for dealing with workplace injustice don’t give them a voice.”

The study, Is negative attention better than no attention? The comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work, is forthcoming in the journal Organization Science and was co-authored by Professor Jane O’Reilly, Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, Professor Jennifer Berdahl, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, and Professor Sara Banki, Graduate School of Management and Economics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran.



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