subscribe to careers
MEDIA, JOBS & RESOURCES for the COMMON GOOD
News  |  General

Persistent Disadvantage Revealed - BSL Report


Tuesday, 28th April 2015 at 12:13 pm
Lina Caneva
Almost a quarter of people who lifted themselves out of poverty are poor again just one or two years later, according to a study by welfare Not for Profit, the Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Tuesday, 28th April 2015
at 12:13 pm
Lina Caneva


0 Comments


FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

 Print
Persistent Disadvantage Revealed - BSL Report
Tuesday, 28th April 2015 at 12:13 pm

Almost a quarter of people who lifted themselves out of poverty are poor again just one or two years later, according to a study by welfare Not for Profit, the Brotherhood of St Laurence.

The new study identifies Australians who are more vulnerable to falling into poverty and are more likely to remain poor, or “churn in and out of poverty”  — including older people and the long-term unemployed.

Among those who experienced poverty, the study found that more than 35 per cent of those who escaped it did not become poor again over 11 years, the time period analysed by the study. On the other hand 12 per cent were still poor after the 11 years had passed.

The Brotherhood's research, ‘Persistent Disadvantage’, is a chapter in a major new report, Addressing entrenched disadvantage in Australia by the Committee for Economic Development of Australia, CEDA, which was released last week and revealed that more than a million Australians are living in poverty.

Lead BSL researcher Dr Francisco Azpitarte said: "Poverty is relatively short-lived for many Australians who experience it, but for some groups it can be persistent.

"In particular older Australians, the long-term unemployed, people with limited education, households where no-one has a job, households where at least one member has a disability — not just individuals with disabilities themselves — and people living in highly disadvantaged areas are more likely to remain poor.

"Even if they are able to leave poverty they are more likely to become poor again, and the longer people remain in poverty, the less likely they are to escape it."

Dr Azpitarte and study co-author Dr Eve Bodsworth used data from the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey to use an approach to measuring poverty that traces individuals and households over time.

They also measure not only income, but other factors including health, employment status and education. HILDA has been running since 2001, when it began with a sample of 7862 households containing 19,914 people.

The study said further investigation was needed to understand the factors that enable some households to move out and stay out of poverty. The "poverty churn" for some households points to the need to look at ways not only to assist people out of poverty, but also to safeguard against them returning to it.

"This might require a shift in policy focus towards employment retention and advancement rather than simply emphasising into paid work," the study said.

“A longer-term perspective looking at employment across the working years may also be necessary — with other research indicating that higher incidences of poverty among older people, especially women, are rooted in their work histories.

"Challenges for policymakers arising out of understanding poverty from a dynamic perspective … may require a shift in perspective towards understanding individuals in the context of the life span rather than as part of a cohort at a point in time.

Read the Addressing entrenched disadvantage in Australia report.


Lina Caneva  |  Editor  |  @ProBonoNews

Lina Caneva has been a journalist for more than 35 years. She was the editor of Pro Bono Australia News from when it was founded in 2000 until 2018.


Got a story to share?

Got a news tip or article idea for Pro Bono News? Or perhaps you would like to write an article and join a growing community of sector leaders sharing their thoughts and analysis with Pro Bono News readers?

Get in touch at news@probonoaustralia.com.au

Get more stories like this

FREE SOCIAL
SECTOR NEWS

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Australia’s welfare system failing to protect vulnerable people

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 4th December 2019 at 4:27 pm

Five charts on what a Newstart recipient really looks like

Contributor

Wednesday, 30th October 2019 at 3:56 pm

Overwhelmed?

Marilyn Jones

Monday, 21st October 2019 at 8:36 am

We rise and fall together

Andrew Cairns

Thursday, 17th October 2019 at 7:30 am

POPULAR

NDIS not yet in tune with the needs of participants

Luke Michael

Monday, 20th January 2020 at 4:46 pm

What impact will the bushfire crisis have on homelessness?

Luke Michael

Wednesday, 15th January 2020 at 4:28 pm

The rise (and scepticism) of Facebook fundraisers

Maggie Coggan

Thursday, 16th January 2020 at 8:49 am

Bushfire resources for people with disability

Contributor

Wednesday, 15th January 2020 at 4:54 pm

Subscribe to News
pba inverse logo
Subscribe Twitter Facebook

Get the social sector's most essential news coverage. Delivered free to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday morning.

You have Successfully Subscribed!