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Why the ‘great resignation’ can help you find a better job


4 November 2021 at 3:31 pm
Maggie Coggan
Across the globe, millions of people are rethinking their jobs en masse. We find out why this new phenomenon is a good thing for jobseekers. 


Maggie Coggan | 4 November 2021 at 3:31 pm


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Why the ‘great resignation’ can help you find a better job
4 November 2021 at 3:31 pm

Across the globe, millions of people are rethinking their jobs en masse. We find out why this new phenomenon is a good thing for jobseekers. 

If the pandemic has made you rethink your career path, you’re not alone. 

Data from Microsoft suggests that an estimated 40 per cent of the global workforce is considering changing jobs in 2021. 

The phenomenon has been dubbed “the great resignation” and, as organisations plan their return-to-work protocols, experts believe it’s about to hit Aussie shores. 

So why are so many people quitting their jobs? Well, the pandemic has allowed for a lot of reflection time, and many are realising that their workplaces aren’t meeting their needs or aligning with their values.    

If you’re one of these restless jobseekers, you might be wondering how can you use this workforce shift to your advantage.

We sat down with Leonie Mitaxa, senior associate for strategy and change at workplace analysts, Unispace, to find out. 

What impact will this great resignation have on the Australian workforce? 

The great resignation hands power to workers; the pendulum has shifted from the employer calling the shots – as to where, how, and when employees will work – to employees.

The experience of the pandemic has many employees rethinking what they want from work,

whether that’s a career change to provide deeper meaning in the work they do, or accepting an offer from an employer with a better culture than their current organisation.

What sort of opportunities does this phenomenon present for jobseekers? 

The Great Resignation is creating a talent war, placing employees at a strong advantage.  With employers competing for top talent in many industries, employees are free to be more selective in who they choose to work for, and why.

What kinds of things are employees looking for in this post-pandemic world, and how should managers meet these new demands? 

At Unispace we’ve surveyed thousands of employees throughout the pandemic, to understand their views on the value of the workplace, and the value of remote working. 

There are pros and cons to each environment, and they tend to complement each other.

From our data it’s clear that employees have most strongly missed the social side of the workplace; the opportunity to build professional relationships. They also believe collaboration for creativity and innovation is more easily done face to face than virtually. The primary benefits of working from home or working remotely include reduced time and costs associated with commuting, better work/life balance, and more time and access to wellbeing activities (such as exercise, walking the dog, meditation practices, home cooked meals).

Most organisations we’re working with are creating hybrid workplace models that balance the benefits of the workplace with the benefits of working from home. These arrangements look different for each organisation, with variations in time spent in the workplace and the flexibility for employees to choose where they work and when.

Managers should seek to understand their employees’ preferences and provide autonomy and choice to their employees wherever possible. Inviting their employees to participate in shaping the hybrid model that supports their needs while meeting the needs of the business goes a long way to making employees feel appreciated and respected. And this makes them much more likely to stay.


Maggie Coggan  |  Journalist  |  @MaggieCoggan

Maggie Coggan is a journalist at Pro Bono News covering the social sector.

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